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WOOD FLOORING STAMPS - A Picture Says A Thousand Words

WOOD FLOORING STAMPS - a picture says a thousand words.

Some things make sense.  Other things don't.

Going into a house for a pre-drywall inspection, and looking UP at the UNDERSIDE of the third level flooring, I saw this.   ------>

What can I say?

My clients, from another country, are counting on me to inform them as to what they are buying.

THEY TRUST ME.

What would you say to them?

They were told the stamp doesn't matter!  Okaaay...

So,

  • I explained what Oriented Strand Board is (OSB). 
  • I explained the manufacturer's limited  warranty.  If you look up OSB warranties, manufacturers want their product "strictly installed to [the manufacturer's] instructions," and say things like, "for best results," "only when instructions are followed," "any improper and incompatible installation," "any misapplication," "any failure to comply with manufacturer's installation instructions," and the like.  Warranties can be made null and void by improper whatever.
  • I explained that the flooring has a tongue and groove, and that is intended to fit together a particular way to allow for expansion and to prevent buckling and humps.
  • I explained that one side of the flooring handles glue better, so when the floors are glued and nailed they perform better to avoid future squeaks and delamination.
  • I explained that some flooring has drain holes depending on where it is installed and that the flooring has to be installed a certain way for those holes to function properly.
  • I explained that the stamp is there for various reasons.

And I said that they have a photograph and should bring this up to the builder.  On the main level all the stamps faced up.  On the upper level they did not.  Why?  Different crew?  No reado goodo?

I said to them, "A picture says a thousand words."

My recommendation:  sometimes a home inspector has to be geeky with his clients to make a point.  There are reasons for things - slope, proper connections, the right materials, support, angles - you name it!  And there are reasons for stamps on materials - roofing, walls, flooring, decking, windows - you name it!  It is simply best in life to follow the instructions!  And when you don't, consequences can follow.  I can hardly wait to hear what happens here!

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 17 commentsJay Markanich • April 07 2016 02:52AM

Comments

Thanks again for a great post.  I enjoy reading your comments. 

Posted by Peter Mohylsky, South Walton, Let me help you find your path to the beach. (PrimeSouth Properties) over 3 years ago

Thank you Peter.  I come here often!  Glad you enjoy my posts.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Good morning Jay! Reminds me of the story about "green side up!"! Enjoy your day!

Posted by Wayne Martin, Real Estate Broker - Retired (Wayne M Martin) over 3 years ago

Same story, different words, Wayne!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

That is funny and utterly stupid.

BTW, I would never install wood flooring directly on OSB.  Not approved. (or at least I wouldn't nail it in; doesn't matter for floating floor).

Posted by Women of Westchester Working Together, Women helping Women get ahead (Women of Westchester Working Together) over 3 years ago

Debbie - ALL the builders here do.  I have understood that if the OSB is 3/4", there is tar paper, and, ideally, CC brads it is okay.  But, like I said, builders do here, and I NEVER see 3/4" sub flooring.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Jay Markanich "There are reasons for things - slope, proper connections, the right materials, support, angles - you name it!  And there are reasons for stamps on materials - roofing, walls, flooring, decking, windows - you name it!  It is simply best in life to follow the instructions! "  You "nailed" it!  Re-Blog!

Posted by Tony and Suzanne Marriott, Associate Brokers, Serving Scottsdale, Phoenix and Maricopa County AZ (Haven Express @ Keller Williams Arizona Realty) over 3 years ago

Great catch Jay.  So once they have framed up the upper level, how would the builder correct this problem?  If I were the buyer, I would want it corrected or I would walk.

Posted by Stephen Weakley (Nationwide Mortgage Services) over 3 years ago

T&S - thanks!  I commented on your site.

Stephen - this is the kind of thing that makes you understand why builders don't want pre-drywall inspections.  Sometimes I come up with weird stuff, but necessary to repair!  Once a steel beam was 3" too short and the builder was mad that I commented on it because I am "not a PC..."  So my client contacted the county, and they condemne the house until the beam was replaced!  Bam!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

This is another very good reason to always opt for a professional home inspection.

Posted by Roy Kelley (Realty Group Referrals) over 3 years ago

On PRE DRYWALL construction Roy!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Good morning, Jay Markanich this post is a prime example of another reason to have a home inspection before the interior is buttoned up and everything covered.... see it while it's visible .... to have a home inspection on a new home after the c.o. is in hand would be too late...

Posted by Barbara Todaro, Marketing Agent for The Todaro Team (RE/MAX Executive Realty ) over 3 years ago

It's things like this which lead me to believe that builders intentionally try to prevent pre-drywall inspections, Barbara.  And tell their clients that they are unnecessary.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Hi Jay,  
Just one more reason homes should be inspected during construction.  I used to tag along with a REALTOR friend who did during construction inspections for lenders.  It was very interesting.

Posted by Carol Williams, Retired Agent / Broker / Property Manager (Although I'm retired, I love sharing my knowledge and learning from other real estate industry professionals.) over 3 years ago

They are all different Carol, and I come up with interesting stuff.  This is the only time to see the house in a skeletal condition.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

And that is why inspectors can be essential, even on new construction.

Posted by Bob Crane, Forestland Experts! 715-204-9671 (Woodland Management Service / Woodland Real Estate, Keller Williams Fox Cities) over 3 years ago

I've beeen doing pre-drywall inspections for about 20 years Bob (home inspections for 35), and every one is different!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

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