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Trees Usually Don't Get Smaller

Even pulling up to the house I saw a tree very near to the corner and it was large!  And I thought, trees usually don't get any smaller.

I don't know why people get the idea to put a tree so close to the house when it is obvious that even with minimal care it will still grow larger! 

And some trees grow really large!

This tree is six feet from a corner porch.

It is a Brown Birch.  It can get 120' high and 80' wide.

Here it is framed in a little, raised garden, surrounded by a thin stone retaining wall.

The wall is cracking substantially in four places!

And it's too bad.  It really is a gorgeous little garden and the wall is very nicely done.  It snaked all along the front of the house.

But trees do what trees do!

Landscaping can add to the value of a house.  But be smart!  Plan ahead!  Understand what is being planted!

My recommendation:  when you get the idea to plant trees near the house, make sure of three things:

1.  They are miniature trees!  The small Japanese Maples are popular the beautiful and only grow six or eight feet high.  There are many such ornamental trees that complement a house wonderfully.

2.  The root system is mostly a tap system, going down and not out.  Trees with aggressive roots that expand outward can be damaging to driveways, sidewalks, porch stairs, decks, foundations, and gardens with pretty walls!  They collect and retain moisture around the house and cause underground erosion and sink holes!

3.  The branches are not so near that they can damage siding and roofs!  Because they will.

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 103 commentsJay Markanich • October 24 2015 12:19AM

Comments

 Good Saturday morning Jay. No, they don't! Unless you have the Gazinta tree.  it starts off at full height and shrinks as it gets older.

Posted by TeamCHI - Complete Home Inspections, Inc., Home Inspectons - Nashville, TN area - 615.661.029 (Complete Home Inspections, Inc.) about 3 years ago

Another issues is shrubbery. It often is neglected and grows so tal it hides the house. In some extreme cases It can cover the entire house or at least one story. 

Posted by Jim Lee, Portsmouth NH Realtor, Portsmouth, NH (RE/MAX Shoreline) about 3 years ago

Right.  Plan ahead.

Oh and I thought about you this week.  I saw something that reminded me of blog post you did a while back (but I couldn't find it).  In the basement of my customer's house (that they just bought), the metal vents or pipes (not sure the right term) were painted white.  Is that kosher?

Posted by Debbie Gartner, The Flooring Girl & Blog Stylist -Dynamo Marketers (The Flooring Girl) about 3 years ago

Good morning Jay. Sage advice seldom taken. You are showing the results. Enjoy your day!

Posted by Wayne Martin, Real Estate Broker - Retired (Wayne M Martin) about 3 years ago

Yes, I see that all the time here in Louisville, and even some of the "groups" who provide trees, will suggest that they are put in the space between sidewalks and curb that the city owns. Years later, the sidewalk is ruined, and the tree starts its slow dealth.

Always wondered why people do that, because like you said, its rare for a tree to grow smaller.

Great post by the way, made me think.

Posted by Michael Thacker - Re/Max Real Estate Center - Louisville, Your best friend who just happens to be a Realtor (Re/Max Real Estate Center - The Thacker Group) about 3 years ago

Great info, Thanks!

Trees with aggressive roots that expand outward can be damaging to driveways, sidewalks, porch stairs, decks, foundations, and gardens with pretty walls!  They collect and retain moisture around the house and cause underground erosion and sink holes!

Posted by Sham Reddy, CRS (H E R Realty, Dayton, OH) about 3 years ago

If only they could remember that the trees the will become large go on the perimeter of yard.  The garden centers nursery's should be consulted before planting, it might save a lot of headaches and money down the road

Posted by Doris Freeman, Broker/Agent, Realtor, Madison-Gibson-Crockett (RE/MAX REALTY SOURCE) about 3 years ago

So very true! I often wonder what part of "up to 80 feet wide" people don't understand when they plant something 6 feet away from a structure.

Posted by Becca Rasmussen (HomeSmart Cherry Creek) about 3 years ago

Michael T. - sounds like a tall tale to me!  I've never heard of something springing to life full grown and getting smaller.  And Google didn't have a Gazinta example for me to see. 

Jim - I have had those posts too!  On overgrown shrubbery and ivy!

Debbie - not sure what you mean.  Vent and drain pipes can be painted to blend them into the background, but not sure how that would be not kosher.  I've seen it though.

Wayne - thanks.  And aside from being wise, sage blows across the sets in Western movies!

Michael Th. - that is a popular mistake as well. 

Thanks Sham for stopping by.  And quoting me!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Doris - if you consult planting guides they will tell you how much space trees need to grow and how far they should be apart from each other.

Becca - it is a mystery that I see every time I drive through a neighborhood!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Good morning Jay. Your title coupled with the cracked stone enclosure made me laugh. Agreed.

Posted by Sheila Anderson, The Real Estate Whisperer Who Listens 732-715-1133 (Referral Group Incorporated) about 3 years ago

Good morning Jay,

Sometimes like staging an empty house paying someone to stage the yard. In the long run it will save money.

Make yourself a great day.

Posted by Raymond E. Camp, Licensed Real Estate Salesperson Greater Rochester (Howard Hanna Real Estate Services) about 3 years ago

Sheila - usually when people plant things they are cutsie wootsy.  A little forethought is needed!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Some people are obviously just clueless. Trees that close to the house can eventually cause foundation problem. Not to mention, tree removal can get very expensive and even require city permits.

Posted by Rob Arnold, Metro Orlando Full Service - Investor Friendly & F (Sand Dollar Realty Group, Inc.) about 3 years ago

Rob - and I find that sometimes the HOA can be more stringent than any other jurisdiction!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Great advice, tress are beautiful but can cause so much damage.  Another big mistake I see is homeowners will install landscape bark next to the home.  This creates a haven and almost guarantees termites!

 

Myers & Myers Real Estate

Posted by John Myers, Your Trusted Real Estate Advisor (Myers & Myers Real Estate, Inc) about 3 years ago

I have some giant palms that do what they want but I have news for them...In about 3 more decades, I won't mind much

Posted by Richie Alan Naggar, agent & author (people first...then business Ran Right Realty ) about 3 years ago

Tree seedlings started by bird droppings can sprout near house foundations.  You never know how big they may grow!

Posted by Brian Schulman, Lancaster County PA RealEstate Expert 717-951-5552 (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Lancaster PA) about 3 years ago

Great post and so true!!  I have some palm trees crack a wall between  my pool and planter box.  Trees planted before my time by my husband!!!  Expensive and sad to remove tree.

Posted by Shirley Coomer, Realtor, Keller Williams Realty, Phoenix Az (Keller Williams Realty Sonoran Living) about 3 years ago

Those are great tips about trees near the house - 80 feet wide is HUGE...  I bet that's bigger than the entire house.

Posted by Kat Palmiotti, The House Kat (Grand Lux Realty, Monroe NY, 914-419-0270, kat@thehousekat.com) about 3 years ago

We see this all too often...wat started as tiny evergreen trim becomes giant hedges...and in one older house the rootf of the "just bushes" grew right thru the concrete block of the basement !

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Realtors - Luxury - Divorce (EXP Realty 414-525-0563) about 3 years ago

John - I put that as a generic comment on all my inspection reports, unless the house is a high condo!

Richie - please climb up and trim them and send me a photo.

Brian - trees start for a variety of reasons, but humans are the most likely!

Shirley - you mean those trees grew too?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Kat - some people put Weeping Willows real close to houses and those are very damaging!

S&D - I have seen plants in houses 40' from their source outside!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

I see this alot, especially with new built construction. The builder puts in his "landscape package" and the just stick a few bushes and baby trees around to make it look good. Yes, they're cute and pretty when they are planted, but in years to come you get stuff like in your picture!

Posted by Fred Hernden, CMI, Albuquerque area Master Inspector (Superior Home Inspections - Greater Albuquerque Area) about 3 years ago

Fred - last week I had a new build with a Cherry Blossom 4' from the corner of the house.  I wrote it up!

Thems get big!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

I see this all the time Jay. I don't understand why people plant trees so close to their home. They see this little sapling and don't have the foresight to know that little sapling is going to be a huge mesquite or ficus tree in the future. 

Posted by Nicole Doty - Gilbert Real Estate Expert, Broker/Owner of Zion Realty ZionRealtyAZ.com (Zion Realty) about 3 years ago

Wish new home Builders would be considered about these details. They plant cheapest tree in the yard and many home owners don't realize long term consequences.

Posted by Ritu Desai, Virginia Realtor-Fairfax/Loudoun/PW-703-625-4949 (Samson Properties) about 3 years ago

In my neighborhood homes were built among the Ponderosa Pines. My yard has about 7 trees that are 60 to 80 feet tall. Obviously the trees were here long before the home. One of the problems here is that some people want the pines to grow dense like they do in Atlanta. In nature, Ponderosas grow BIG and far apart.

Posted by John Mosier, Prescott's Patriot Agent 928 533-8142 (Realty ONE Group Mountain Desert) about 3 years ago

Planning ahead is hard when trying to do something quickly, Nicole.

Ritu - around here, as you know, builders are famous for planting cheap Sugar Maple.  They grow huge and have very aggressive roots.

John - from my understanding pines have tap roots.  And if they existed before the house there should still be some setback planned for future growth.  Hopefully!

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

I agree that planting trees must be a huge part of any landscape plan but often I see it's the landscaper who actually arranges the type and placement of trees.  This happens in new home landscaping and also in re-doing older landscape.  Property owners depend on professionals to provide information on the type of trees that go best esthetically as well as what works for the space. I also see vines planted near homes either intentionally or unintentionally and they can creep up structures and cause severe damage to the house and roof. 

Posted by Teri Pacitto, Real Estate, Your Style...Your Home...My Specialty (Compass) about 3 years ago

Yes - about those branches that get too near! I have two overgrown (and beautiful) oaks that need serious pruning to get the branches off the roof.  I'm sure the orignal owners planted tiny specimens - but the house was built in the 1920s.

Posted by Margaret Goss, Chicago's North Shore & Winnetka Real Estate (Baird & Warner Real Estate) about 3 years ago

I completely agree on tap root systems and even away from the house. It also can mean that you are fighting root systems when trying to plant lanscaping close to the house.

Posted by Joe Pryor, REALTOR® - Oklahoma Investment Properties (The Virtual Real Estate Team) about 3 years ago

Teri - I have had other posts on vines, shrubs and other vegetation too near or on the house.  It's a problem!  My inspection report has commentary about that on every single one, unless I am reporting about a high condo.  Here the builders tell the landscapers what to plant.  And I find that lots of the "landscapers" can't read or speak English to know what they are doing anyway.

Margeret - those do need pruning!  They are quite established.  Oak branches are strong and will damage roofs if allowed.

Joe - I have a Maple way in my front yard and its roots influence my garden and make it hard to plant flowers!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Big Tree. I have a number of Magnolia Trees in my yard. Thought they were pretty when I first bought the house. Now I am looking for my chain saw. Oaks can be the same.

Posted by Bill Reddington, Destin Florida Real Estate (Re/max Southern Realty) about 3 years ago

I have also sometimes wondered this, I love large trees, but they can cause a lot of damange if near a home. 

Posted by Stefan Winter, Owner - Winter Group & Real Estate Web Tech (Real Estate in IL & NV | Owner of Real Estate Web Tech | Daily Vlogger) about 3 years ago

Hi Jay - We also see this frequently and wonder what they were thinking when they planted that tree - a bit of thought and planning could have saved a lot of money.

Posted by Dick Greenberg, Northern Colorado Residential Real Estate (New Paradigm Partners LLC) about 3 years ago

They get pretty large Bill.  And those leaves are hard to chew up!

Stefan - wonder no more!

In a nutshell, absolutely right Dick!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Jay Markanich ,

 

Great blog . Most people don't understand that while they are beautiful those trees and their pesky roots can cause a lot of issues later on.

Posted by Vera Gonzalez, Gonzo For Real Estate (RE/MAX Suburban, Inc.) about 3 years ago

I too, wish homeowners would think ahead when planting.
I bought a 6 year old house with bamboo planted in the yard. Bamboo spreads fast and is hard to remove or contain.
We had to chop them to the ground and poison them for three years before they would finally stop growing/spreading.

Posted by Athina Boukas, Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) (Virginia Capital Realty) about 3 years ago

We have that issue with Ficus trees out here, over time they get huge with sprawling roots. 

Posted by Karen Fiddler, Broker/Owner, Orange County & Lake Arrowhead, CA (949)510-2395 (Karen Parsons-Fiddler, Broker 949-510-2395) about 3 years ago

Yep see this fairly regularly - damages to driveways, sidewalks, curbs, fences, and unfortunately sewer lines. And there is the issue of large trees that encroach on the neighbor's property, which can raise all sorts of issues. And how about a tree in the neighbor's yard that grows larger and then block some of the sunlight to the neighbor's solar system on their roof - there are some regulations about this as I understand

Posted by Jeff Dowler, CRS, The Southern California Relocation Dude (Solutions Real Estate ) about 3 years ago

Vera - I have heard that some trees are twice as big below ground than above!

Athina - bamboo is hugely fast growing.  It is a rhizome plant, which means that roots spread and spring up elsewhere.  Poison ivy is a rhizome plant too!

I have heard that Karen, but have never seen a Ficus in a yard - but I have in offices!

Wow, Jeff.  And how can you tell someone what to do with their property?  A tree root in my mother's front yard grew about 60' through the drain line and came into the house through the basement floor drain!

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Jay, when I read your post, it seems like it should be soooo obvious!  Trees grow. I mean du-uh!  

Posted by Patricia Kennedy, Home in the Capital (RLAH Real Estate) about 3 years ago

Lot of good points.  We have a lot of trees on our lot and we had do have some removed and others trimmed back.

Posted by Joan Whitebook, Consumer Focused Real Estate Services (BHG The Masiello Group) about 3 years ago

It looks like someone did a lot of work on that stone wall.  Too bad the tree is so big and close...

Posted by Evelyn Johnston, The People You Know, Like and Trust! (Friends & Neighbors Real Estate) about 3 years ago

I love trees and I really should have cut a few more before we built our home.  I think I'll have to take some down before I sell the house.

Posted by Tammy Lankford,, Broker GA Lake Sinclair/Eatonton/Milledgeville (Lane Realty Eatonton, GA Lake Sinclair, Milledgeville, 706-485-9668) about 3 years ago

Good info to consider.  It is so important to know your horticulture or hire someone who does so that you don't end up paying for it in the end.  Some species can be devastatingly invasive.

Posted by Ralph Gorgoglione, Hawaii and California Real Estate (800) 591-6121 (Maui Life Homes / Metro Life Homes) about 3 years ago

Jay Markanich planting a tree is a good idea - as long as they are a bit away from home and foundation.

Posted by Praful Thakkar, Andover, MA: Andover Luxury Homes For Sale (LAER Realty Partners) about 3 years ago

Pat - so does ivy, shrubbery and when well planned all is well!  Key word - plan.

Joan - that is called maintenance.

Evelyn - the stone wall was beautiful and the garden it framed was too.  I felt badly seeing what happened to it.

Tammy - sooner or later they reach critical mass.  And then decisions have to be made.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Ralph - landscape professionals are supposed to know this stuff.  But in this day and age it is easy for anyone to do their own research.

Praful - any planting is a good idea!  Just do it right!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

That was a beautiful stone wall-very few think ahead before understanding the diameter and height that some trees reach-one example are beautiful Willow trees that when they become large are going to seek water hence the well-water pipes can cause damage.

Posted by Gail Petrowsky, House flipper and life coach (Gail Petrowsky, Inc) about 3 years ago

Many builders make the mistake of not looking into the future to see what they just planted will grow into.

Posted by Robert Schott & Paula Hemani, Your Link to Real Estate (TeamConnect Realty) about 3 years ago

Excellent advice, Jay.   It is sad to see a cracked foundation or other damage from a tree that should not have been planted there.

Posted by Fred Griffin, Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker (Fred Griffin Real Estate) about 3 years ago

When we bought our house there were several trees too close to the house.  They had to be removed not only for what they could do below ground but also for the way they would spread above ground

Posted by Ed Silva, Central CT Real Estate Broker Serving all equally (RE/MAX Professionals, CT 203-206-0754 ) about 3 years ago

Gail - tree roots seek any pipe they can find!

R&P - I think they go to the garden center to get the best deal they can, and then plant it!

Fred - I have seen cracking in so many things from tree roots.

Ed - damage high and low can be expected.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Jay, once again you've posted a fantastic blog to help homeowners!! Thank you!

Posted by Carla Freund, Raleigh - Cary Triangle Real Estate 919-602-8489 (Keller Williams Preferred Realty) about 3 years ago

You are very nice to me, thank you Carla!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Jay -  that was one thingI followed when landscaping my house.  There are some pseudo landscapers that coed it in with no thought to growth.

Posted by Grant Schneider, Your Coach Helping You Create Successful Outcomes (Performance Development Strategies) about 3 years ago

I had a neighbor in a townhouse community with a Sycamore in the front yard.  It was 40-50 feet tall and touched his house and those on either side.  Every fall gutters clogged with leaves and ice built up.  What a mess.  I drove by the old neighborhood this weekend and it was still there.

Posted by Stephen Weakley (Nationwide Mortgage Services) about 3 years ago

The way I see it . . . it's all a "plot" . . . LOL.  The trees are planted by the sidewalk during the development stage of the subdivision.  A "must" have by city planners:  TREES!   Then the root system grows as does the tree.  In 20 years, all the sidewalks are cracked.  The city, who has made us have sidewalk easements through our property, now come around and say the cracked sidewalks need to be repaired.   OMIGOSH . . . what a racket.  

Posted by Carla Muss-Jacobs, RETIRED (RETIRED / State License is Inactive) about 3 years ago

Hey, Jay!

I included this post in today's "Last Week's Favorites".  Enjoy the rest of your weekend.

Posted by Patricia Kennedy, Home in the Capital (RLAH Real Estate) about 3 years ago

Hello Jay ... great post my friend, congrats on the GOLD STAR and featured to the group:

Addicted to Active Rain

Posted by Robert Vegas Bob Swetz, Las Vegas Henderson Homes for Sale (Realty ONE Group) about 3 years ago

Landscapers especially should think, Grant.  Good heavens!

Sycamores get pretty big Stephen.  And I bet they were quickly sick a' more of those big, round seeds every year!

Carla - nail hit on head!  Driven in with one smack!

Thanks Pat!  Always a pleasure!  As you know...

And thank you, AB!  And featured there is fun too!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

An excellent reminder and set of tips about planting trees. We see so many driveways that are cockeyed because of roots pushing up from very large and mature trees.

Posted by Nina Hollander, Your Charlotte/Ballantyne/Waxhaw/Fort Mill Realtor (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | Charlotte, NC) about 3 years ago

Thanks Nina.  And the driveway comment is so true!  I see it many times a month.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Good morning Jay Markanich ,

Excellent advice for those thinking of planting trees. I showed a house the other day and the driveway was heaved, cracked and bucking. You could see it was caused by the roots of the tree right by the driveway. Many of our builders left trees and built the homes nestled in and around them so not to remove the trees that offered shade to the property. Good intentions..but still problems!

Posted by Dorie Dillard CRS GRI ABR, Serving Buyers & Sellers in NW Austin Real Estate (Coldwell Banker United Realtors® ~ 512.346.1799) about 3 years ago

Driveways are all too common for root cracking Dorie.  Good for you for noticing it!  Must be something that is everywhere, because it sure happens a lot around here.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

This is another good reminder for home owners to be careful on tree placement and to take a close look at trees when purchasing a home.

Posted by Roy Kelley, Roy and Dolores Kelley Photographs (Realty Group Referrals) about 3 years ago

This one looks to be done by a professional. It's a shame they didn't remember the rules they were surely taught in landscaper school. This would have been in class 101, "Stupid Stuff Not To Do, EVER" This guy must have skipped that day. 

Posted by Scott Seaton Jr. Bourbonnais Kankakee IL Home Inspector, The Home Inspector With a Heart! (SLS Home Inspections-Bradley Bourbonnais Kankakee Manteno) about 3 years ago

Jay,

I see tjis quite often.  Home owners should take into consideration how big the trees will end up in the long run.  The large trees are better off placed away from all structures in the middle of a large yard or acreage.

Brigita

Posted by Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker, The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around (Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd.) about 3 years ago

My landscaper cut away a root last fall that was very close to damaging the underground sprinkler system. It's often what we don't see that can cause the most damage.

Posted by John Novak, Henderson, Las Vegas and Summerlin Real Estate (Keller Williams Realty The Marketplace) about 3 years ago

It can be hard to judge how big a tree will get...Most people when planting mmore than one willl plant then to close

Posted by William Feela, Realtor, Whispering Pines Realty 651-674-5999 No. (WHISPERING PINES REALTY) about 3 years ago

Ironically, I had to trim a tree back from our house just this week.  The foundation is fine thankfully, Jay Markanich ... but the branches were hitting the roof.  It's obvious the original landscaping didn't take your points into consideration ...

Sharing!

Gene

Posted by Gene Mundt, IL/WI Mortgage Originator - FHA/VA/Conv/Jumbo/Portfolio/Refi, 708.921.6331 - 40+ yrs experience (NMLS #216987, IL Lic. 031.0006220, WI Licensed. APMC NMLS #175656) about 3 years ago

Roy - trees come with planting instructions!  If they don't, look them up!

Scott - this is definitely Class 101.  I bet you see it as often as I.

Brigita - this is true!  I have one or two of these posts a year!

John - trees and shrubs seek that stuff out!  Gotta protect your stuff!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

William - planting instructions typically tell how large a tree will get.  And some have very aggressive and damaging roots!

Gene - gotta look high and low!  And on some trees, what is underground is twice as big as what is over the ground!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

It is a huge problem.  We have had to remove and replace too many trees because of poor planning.

Posted by Randy Prothero, Hawaii REALTOR, (808) 384-5645 (eXp Realty) about 3 years ago

Randy - no pun intended!  And planning is everything.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

My mother-in-law just replaced her asphault driveway because a Blue Spruce planted 50 years ago had run it's roots underneath over the years.   When the roots running along the ground's surface under it expanded as they grew, it was like driving over speed humps.

Posted by DEANNA EARLY - - ( NMLS # 268590 ), Virginia Mortgage Loan Originator (American National Bank and Trust) about 3 years ago

I see that so often, Deanna, and it is unfortunate.  It sometimes takes a while though!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

And tree can live a long time... I just saw a tree in China that dates back 1300 years

Posted by Jack Lewitz (IL Real Estate Specialists) about 3 years ago

It is said the Garden of Gethsemane contains trees that were likely there during the time of Jesus, Jack.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Great Article, and right on.. Thanks for reminding us of this important point.. I was just in Lubbock and I went to visit a friend and her home is surrounded by beautiful oaks.. But the drive has $5000 of damage and should be completely bulldozed and redone.. Beautiful Trees Big Damage.. Get out your check book.

Posted by Dale Dresel, Professional Realtor Maricopa, Gilbert & Goodyear (HomeSmart Success, Maricopa, Gilbert & Goodyear AZ) about 3 years ago

They can put in a new driveway, Dale, but that won't solve the problem.

Roots don't get any smaller, either.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

so true!  Happens all the time in my area that in 10 years the landscaping is so overgrown and needs to be changed

Posted by Amy Gutschow, Professional Real Estate (RE/MAX) about 3 years ago

Things get bigger and plans have to be made Amy.  Professionals should understand this!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Yikes! You are so right and the picture says it all. Planning ahead is very importnat when planting. 

Posted by Dana Hollish Hill, Lead Associate Broker (Hollish Hill Group, Keller William Capital Properties) about 3 years ago

Thanks for posting. I would share that when you remove a tree it is good to get the stump ground or  the roots will keep growing and causing damage. After a while the tree will begin to come back. 

 

Aaron Robertson 

Authority Property Management 

 

 

Posted by Aaron Robertson, We Make Renting Simple. (Authority Property Management) about 3 years ago

Dana - that poor wall had three large cracks like the one pictured.  It was too bad.

Aaron - some landscapers have a big grinder to remove the stump down as far as you want.  Some trees do grow back!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

 

Haha "Trees do what trees do!" so sorry to hear that!

Dean Berlin- Home Inspection All Star Alexandria 

Posted by Dean Berlin about 3 years ago

And they do what they do pretty well, Dean!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

I will never look at trees the same way again. Thanks for sharing these valuable tips. I never really thought about it, but now I will if I ever decide to plant one.

Posted by Sandra Graves, Realtor (Keller Williams Realty) about 3 years ago

I just viewed a home today with a pool and two palm trees are pulling up the cement next to the pool.  I can see this is going to get very expensive when it reaches the pool... and its getting close.... the decko-seal is moved and inch... that is how close this homeowner is to a huge problem that is guaranteed to happen.  They said they had no clue the King palms would do this.

Posted by Doyle Lee Austin Davison Iv, 28+ years serving Investors/Banks/Buyers/sellers (Surf City Realty 714-968-6767) about 3 years ago

I'm glad you got something from the post Sandra!  Before you plant, do a little research.  Research is very easy these days.

Doyle - I see pool patios damaged all the time too!  They had no clue because they didn't research in advance!  Plan ahead...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Great information. We see alot of critters find their way into eves from trees too close ... squirrels, birds, raccoons... here in NC as well.  Additionally they drop and fill gutters rendering them water traps that quickly will rot the back side ( wood) frame of homes quick.  

Posted by Michele Connors, Your Eastern North Carolina Realtor (The Overton Group, LLC Pitt & Carteret County) about 3 years ago

Michele - you are right!  Where there is the proximity of trees I always recommend solid gutter caps.  They work!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

Good Friday morning Jay Markanich -

You have offered sound information. Debbie and I are now debating to down a Maple in our yard.  We are afraid of where the root system is headed and what damage it could cause.  

Posted by John McCormack, CRS, Honesty, Integrity, Results, Experienced. HIRE Me! (Albuquerque Homes Realty) about 3 years ago

John - an arborist told me once that with some trees what is below ground is twice what you see above ground!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

What a great title and post too! You're so right, trees don't grow any smaller and bigger is not always better! I see a lot of evidence of tree damage too. This is great advice and simply the best info for homeowners! Sitting under the old Oak Tree is not always what it's cracked up to be!

Posted by Patricia Feager, MBA, CRS, GRI, Selling Homes Changing Lives (DFW FINE PROPERTIES) about 3 years ago

Patricia - the old oak tree in the distant part of the yard is a wonderful thing!  As you know.  Sitting under that, or swinging, or whatever, is pretty fun.  But not beside the house!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

I agree. Ornamental trees are the only trees that should be planted near the house. Too many problems can arise otherwise. Enjoyed your post. "Trees do what trees do" ;)

Posted by Tina Parker, CNE, REDM, SRES, CSP Home Staging REALTOR, Halifax (Royal LePage Atlantic) about 3 years ago

I think that's right Tina.  The larger trees with aggressive roots should be at least 30' or 40' away.  For Weeping Willows they say 50'!Read the planting instructions!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

One property we bought had a huge tree between my apartments and my neighbors storage building.  The cost to remove it was $6,000.  They had to lift it over my apartments.  Tree can be a big expense.

Posted by Linda Guess, Branson area real estate sales. (Keller Williams Tri-Lakes Branson, MO) about 3 years ago

Trees can be expensive!  So it's best to plant properly and avoid what you had to go through, or worse, Linda.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 3 years ago

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