What I'm Seeing Now

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When The Screwdriver Isn't Just For Screws

When the screwdriver isn't just for screws.

Not that I haven't seen this before.  It's just fun when you can use tools in different ways!

The inspection on this house saw repairs on every single column in front of this house.  There are eight such columns.

Very recent "repairs" on each one were most evident.  The "repair" material was soft to the touch, squishy when tapped on, painted unprofessionally, and obviously covering up rot.  I could have stuck my finger inside the columns in many places.

It looked to this home inspector like every repair on EVERY column was stopgap, would not last very long, and was intended simply to sell the house. 

HOME INSPECTORS DON'T GET INVASIVE OR DESTRUCTIVE DURING HOME INSPECTIONS.

The listing agent was called who was obviously aware of the circumstance.  Defensive, she basically said that the home inspector is incompetent and should be able to prove what he thinks he sees.  And if he doesn't know what he is looking at they should get someone else.  Oh, and he has no business saying mean things without proof.

The house has a front porch with lower columns holding up a flat balcony platform, and higher columns on top of them which hold up a large front roof.  There are eight columns total.

So I asked the selling agent to get the seller's permission to see if there is wood rot present.  They granted permission to see if I could "prove" a problem and allowed the screwdriver test,  but only on one column.  When asked which one I was given permission to test one of the higher ones.

Picking one I climbed up to have a look.

My screwdriver is circled on the left.  A closer look at it is on the right.

That screwdriver is stuck into what is a gaping hole in the wood created by rot.  It was easily inserted into some form of putty.  The putty is quite soft.  And there is soft material all around the area.

That column, indeed all of the columns, are rotting and "repaired" in this fashion.  My screwdriver would have stuck like this into any one of them.  Some were much worse.

My recommendation:  an experienced home inspector can usually look at something and see it is unprofessionally done, and would immediately suspect a cover up.  But most home inspectors are too polite to say such a thing on a report.  Like I did, they would couch things with language that isn't accusing or mean, but filled with question marks, suggesting that the history of the repairs be asked of the sellers, and that further investigation by a structural specialist would be warranted.  BUT, if given permission, a home inspector is quite able to prove what is going on!  After all, the screwdriver isn't just for screws!

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 69 commentsJay Markanich • March 27 2015 01:57AM

Comments

I can see their faces when the report came in.........."Dang it, screwed that one up."

Posted by Scott Seaton Jr. Bourbonnais Kankakee IL Home Inspector, The Home Inspector With a Heart! (SLS Home Inspections-Bradley Bourbonnais Kankakee Manteno) over 3 years ago

When the screwdriver went in I hadn't yet written the report Scott!   With that photo it included a few fewer question marks...

And great play on words!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Jay, did they really believe they were going to pull the wool over an inspector's eyes? Enjoy your day!

Posted by Wayne Martin, Real Estate Broker - Retired (Wayne M Martin) over 3 years ago

Home inpectors for most part are very professional in looking at things from a professional perspective and calling it like it is.  However, some inspectors must have a built in ego for giving their opinions on matters than the buyers read into reports based on their experience or in conjunction with a realotrs come up with items that needs to addressed from a health and habitability perspective

Posted by Sham Reddy, CRS (H E R Realty, Dayton, OH) over 3 years ago

I wonder now if they are going to have the issue fixed by a professional or admit to their screw up?  

Posted by James Dray, Exceptional Agents, Outstanding Results (Fathom Realty AR LLC) over 3 years ago

I guess that depends on how "incompetent" the inspector is Wayne!

Sham - this is certainly an item that might affect habitability!

James - I expect this is a very expensive thing to fix. 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

That is not a good repair at all.  But many home owners do things like that.

Posted by Russ Ravary ~ Metro Detroit Realtor call (248) 310-6239, Michigan homes for sale ~ yesmyrealtor@gmail.com (Real Estate One) over 3 years ago

OMG that is just crazy. She dared you and now they are paying dearly.  What a mess.

Posted by Debbie Gartner, The Flooring Girl & Blog Stylist -Dynamo Marketers (The Flooring Girl) over 3 years ago

Russ - of course it isn't, but nobody said who did it!

Debbie - I don't have much ego in these circumstances.  I had a realtor once say I was an idiot because everyone knows there can't be mold in attics.  So I just sent her a photo and asked her to please explain what was all over the place.  I never heard from her.  If they are going to allow me to probe, I will!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

That is a riot Jay, the listing agent actually described you as being mean in questioning the integrity of a building? That's such an bizarre choice of words for someone doing their job!

Posted by Annette Thor, Residential & Commercial Real Estate Broker in CT (Connecticut Homes and Commercial Fairfield Cty,CT reinct.com) over 3 years ago

Glad to know that there is someone looking out for the buyer. How much do you think the fix will cost the seller?

Posted by Lise Howe, Assoc. Broker and Attorney Licensed in DC, MD, VA, (Keller Williams Capital Properties) over 3 years ago

Well, I could not have been more polite Annette.  I am usually.  And my reports too.  I think someone's ox was getting gored and it was a defensive reaction.  It lead to more!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Unknown Lise.  The flat roof is bad and leaking.  The columns are rottinig and the structure is compromised.  In my opinion anyway.  I would rely more on an engineer's opinion as to cost than I would a contractor's.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Yicks...was there duct tape undert the paint too ?

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Realtors - Luxury - Divorce (EXP Realty 414-525-0563) over 3 years ago

Listing agents would serve their owner/clients well to discuss these obvious defects when taking the listing.

They don't of course, for fear of not getting the listing.

Sometimes it serves sellers interests better to prepare them for the obvious.  When maintenance neglect affects market value, the seller needs to know it so they can be prepared.

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 3 years ago

It's possible, I suppose, that the owner was unaware of the slip-shod repairs.  Maybe he paid a less-than-stellar contractor to do the repairs.  Or maybe whoever painted the house did it.

Either way.... an inspection-denier is not the way to go.

Posted by Alan May, Helping you find your way home. (Coldwell Banker Residential) over 3 years ago

Good morniong Jay. Well I guess they may be sorry they gave you their permission .

Posted by Sheila Anderson, The Real Estate Whisperer Who Listens 732-715-1133 (Referral Group Incorporated) over 3 years ago

I would think that some of these issues would have been better to have been addressed before getting to this point Jay.

Posted by Tom Arstingstall, General Contractor, Dry Rot, Water Damage Sacramento, El Dorado County - (916) 765-5366, General Contractor, Dry Rot and Water Damage (Dry Rot and Water Damage www.tromlerconstruction.com Mobile - 916-765-5366) over 3 years ago

I'm sure buyer and buyer's agent appreciated your candor.  Rot in weight-bearing columns is no small thing!  As for the seller's agent -- she has no business contradicting a home inspector, period.  

Posted by Dianne Goode, Realtor/Broker (Raleigh Cary Realty) over 3 years ago

A picture is worth 1000 words. Hard to argue with that. Going to be an expensive day for that seller.

Posted by Rob Arnold, Metro Orlando Full Service - Investor Friendly & F (Sand Dollar Realty Group, Inc.) over 3 years ago

The war was lost for want of a screwdriver...? lol    Good post and thank you

Posted by Richie Alan Naggar, agent & author (people first...then business Ran Right Realty ) over 3 years ago

Good morning Jay,

Bet they used a spatula to do the repair and a basting brush to paint!

That is why we have great inspectors such as yourself to find these types of problems.
Make yourself a great day.

Posted by Raymond E. Camp, Licensed Real Estate Salesperson Greater Rochester (Howard Hanna Real Estate Services) over 3 years ago

This looks a lot like what I saw when I visited a client outside of Germantown, Maryland.  The neighborhood was relative new construction, 3-5 years old, and the eaves, porches and window trim were already showing signs of dry rot.  What does that say about construction methods?

Good job by the way.

Posted by Stephen Weakley (Nationwide Mortgage Services) over 3 years ago

Hahahahahaha.... that is classic! I would like to see the egg on the listing agents face!

Posted by Fred Hernden, CMI, Albuquerque area Master Inspector (Superior Home Inspections - Greater Albuquerque Area) over 3 years ago

Those rotted out columns have made the structural integrity of that porch and balcony completely compromised. This was a great catch by a professional inspector. 

Posted by Nicole Doty - Gilbert Real Estate Expert, Broker/Owner of Zion Realty ZionRealtyAZ.com (Zion Realty) over 3 years ago

WOW - thanks for the tip on things to watch for! I appreciate that.

Posted by Travis "the SOLD man" Parker; Associate Broker, email: Travis@theSOLDman.me / cell: 334-494-7846 (Team Linda Simmons, Enterprise, AL 36330) over 3 years ago

Great catch.  Not finding the rot would have been a very expensive and dangerous failure.  Keep it up, and thanks.

Posted by Dan Johnson (LiLi Lua, LLC) over 3 years ago

Yikes Jay! That is a disaster in the making if not remediated and potentially a very dangerous situation for anyone coming in or out of that house. The putty / paint job is extremely sloppy as well!

Posted by Wanda Kubat-Nerdin - Wanda Can!, So Utah Residential, Referral & Relocation REALTOR (Prado Real Estate South) over 3 years ago

I love the screwdriver test. More fun is when the inspector uses ski poles with the basket removed. I wouldn't feel comfortable walking out on the balcony!

Posted by Cynthia Larsen, Independent Broker Serving Sonoma County, CA (Safe Haven Realty) over 3 years ago

Good catch. A screwdriver is a multi-purpose tool.  Sometimes I use it for tightening screws. Glad there were no hornets in there.  They probably moved to a safer location before the column collapsed.

Posted by Jerry Lucas, Mobile Notary Colorado Springs, CO Notary Training (ABC Legal Docs LLC) over 3 years ago

S&D - disturbingly, no.  Can you believe it?  I know, what were they thinking.

Lenn - methinks Miss Listing Agent was well informed.  (We got a bit of a scoop from a neighbor...)

Alan - see comment to Lenn above about the neighbor.

Sheila - they would have found out when my clients had an engineer stop by!

Tom - you would think, I would think, we all would think, for ice cream!

Oh, that last part doesn't go with this one...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Dianne - wait for the report!  But I am glad I asked permission.  They knew it would be found sooner or later, I think.

Rob - expensive day indeed.  Once gotten into, problems sometimes grow.

Richie - war, battle and diplomacy!

Thanks Raymond.  They should have gone to Spatula City!  (Remember Weird Al Yankovic and his spatula routine?)

Stephen - it says what I have been saying for over 20 years - the problem with new construction is the word 'professionalism.'  My sarcastic phrase is "7-11 Construction."  If the shoe fits...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Fred - I really don't have any ego when people say things to me.  You want me to prove it, I will accommodate you.  If you don't want it proved, you accommodate yourself and the deal is fried.  This deal may be fried anyway, over easy, like the egg on that face you talked about.  Foiled again!  Oh, that was a different post.

I think so Nicole.  It has become a dangerous situation, in my book.

Anytime Travis.  I tip my hat your way as well.

Dan - it wasn't hard to see.  A coat of paint doesn't hide much.

Sloppy Wanda?  You can hardly see it.

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Cynthia - you can't see that balcony from inside the house.  The window there is over a high hallway.  No door!

Jerry - that made me laugh!  Wasps, etc. are probably smarter than we are sometimes!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

The listing agent should have known this was going to be discovered and become an issue.  Maybe they did, and maybe they advised the sellers to resolve prior to an inspector calling them out on it and maybe it was the sellers' decision to try and get away with it.  (giving the agent the benefit of the doubt here)

 

Posted by Sharon Tara, New Hampshire Home Stager (Sharon Tara Transformations) over 3 years ago

What? A balcony that isn't accessible except by ladder? I'm shaking my head right now.

Posted by Cynthia Larsen, Independent Broker Serving Sonoma County, CA (Safe Haven Realty) over 3 years ago

Good for you for taking the necessary steps to protect the potential buyer. Unreal what people will try to do to cover something up.

Posted by Paula McDonald, Magnolia Realty ~ Granbury, TX 936-203-0279 (Magnolia Realty ~ Granbury) over 3 years ago

Thanks Sharon.  Not sure that is the benefit of the doubt!

They do that a lot here Cynthia.  It's a southern thing.

Paula - the fix was so obvious it couldn't be missed.  The extent of the problem is still not known.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

My termite guy walks around with one taped to the end of a long stick to test the facia and other out of reach areas.

Posted by Gene Riemenschneider, Turning Houses into Homes (Home Point Real Estate) over 3 years ago

He's allowed to do that Gene!  I ain't...

But that's the best termite-guy story I've heard in a long time!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

I'll be there was no mention of it on any disclosure form either. Looks like a deliberate case of dangerous deception. The buyers are fortunate that you were on the job. 

Posted by Marte Cliff, your real estate writer (Marte Cliff Copywriting) over 3 years ago

What was the listing agent doing there during the inspection? Now they get to disclose everything they learned during the inspection even if the seller didn't want them to know about these things!

Posted by Martin Kalisker, Professional Standards & Legal Assistant (Greater Boston Association of REALTORS) over 3 years ago

Our job is to call it what it is, no need to be rude, but certainly no need to pussyfoot around.  

Posted by Rafi Footerman, Home Inspector, Mold Inspector, Radon and More! (Mid Jersey Inspections) over 3 years ago

Jay Markanich - is that picture real where the whole screwdriver is in the column? Can't believe it.....

Posted by Praful Thakkar, Andover, MA: Andover Luxury Homes For Sale (LAER Realty Partners) over 3 years ago

Jay - Definitely not the typical use for a screwdriver though quite effective in "driving" home the point.

Posted by Christine Donovan, Broker/Attorney 714-319-9751 DRE01267479 - Costa M (Donovan Blatt Realty) over 3 years ago

 Good morning Jay. I do have a screwdriver that I use for probing as well. Sometimes people don't like it but it is what it is.

Posted by TeamCHI - Complete Home Inspections, Inc., Home Inspectons - Nashville, TN area - 615.661.029 (Complete Home Inspections, Inc.) over 3 years ago

Marte - there is no disclosure in Virginia.  It's buyer beware.  Hence the need here for a circumspect home inspector.

She wasn't there Martin.  My client's agent called her.

Thanks Rafi.  As I say, the house is the house.  No need to be impolite - just say what is!

Yes Praful.  I could have stuck my hand in there.  I'm not good enough to fake a photo like that.

 

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Excellent Christine! 

I never probe without permission Michael.  And who's that handsome guy in the new avatar photo?  That's a great photo, whoever it is...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

The scary part is that there are a couple of products that could pass the screwdriver test and still not provide the structural strength needed in this case.  I have used DURHAM'S ROCK HARD Water Putty  for a number of wood repairs but I don't think it is rated for the compression strength. Family Handyman, http://www.familyhandyman.com/carpentry/how-to-use-epoxy-on-wood-for-repairs/view-all, showed post repairs but again the repairs were to the trim rather than the structural member. The things we can't see are even more scary.

Posted by Marshall Brown, BSEE, CHI (Mid America Inspection Services, LLC) over 3 years ago

Interesting post, although I don't carry a screw driver, I've used my fingers to probe and test suspected conditions such as termites or cover ups with fascias, sidings and other suspected structures during property previews. 

Posted by Kimo Jarrett, Pro Lifestyle Solutions (WikiWiki Realty) over 3 years ago

I have seen that before, especially for deck repairs Marshall.  But it wouldn't have been hidden very well in this case.

That stuff proved very soft with finger tips Kimo.  I knew it was putty.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

I'm confused. Did you contact the agent while conducting the home inspection or return later when she told you to prove your point?

Posted by Tammie White, Broker, Franklin TN Homes for Sale (Franklin Homes Realty LLC) over 3 years ago

Crazy builder.. you got to crawl out the window to the balcony or use a ladder,  lol. I hope the rest of the layout is better. What a horrible putty job, when I see workmanship like this, it's like opening up Pandora's box.

Posted by Doyle Lee Austin Davison Iv, 28+ years serving Investors/Banks/Buyers/sellers (Surf City Realty 714-968-6767) over 3 years ago

While we were there Tammie.  The house is too far away for me to want to come back another time.

It's a high window too Doyle.  The high entry hall wall.  From inside the window gives light, but not much view.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Not to take sides here, but if you were to state to the agent the repairs were made as a cover up or to "sell the house", I can see why she would be defensive. I for one would not "couch" what I say regarding the repairs. I would simply state what I see, not making assumptions on anyone's motives. It's really unimportant. Further I would not for one second hesitate in probing suspected rot. I had a very similar issue the other day. I pushed my screw driver right in. The CT Sop clearly allows for probing;

The inspector shall probe a representative number of structural components where deterioration is suspected or where clear indications of possible deterioration exist. Probing is not required when probing would damage any finished surface or where no deterioration is visible.

It's opened ended to allow the inspector to use his discrection, but clearly covers my backside. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 3 years ago

Jay, we don't have to ask permission to probe for rot here.  You cannot break what is already broken and wood decay/rot needs to be found and fixed.

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) over 3 years ago

Screwdrivers aren't just for breakfast anymore .... oh, that's something different. Great job on a 'fun with tools' kinda day.

You're such a 'meanie'.

Posted by Lyn Sims, Schaumburg IL Real Estate (RE/MAX Suburban) over 3 years ago

Jim - even if the agent said he/she intentionally tried to cover up repairs, I would not say that on the report.  And Virginia has no SOP like CT, we are not on a rung that far up the Nannie Ladder yet.  But even if some SOP did allow me, I would NEVER probe without permission that everyone present heard over the phone speaker.  It isn't my property, and a Scout is courteous (even when not deserved).  I wanted and got permission because the house is 55 miles one way from mine and I didn't want to come back!

Charlie - see answer to Jim.  And there were no obvious spots indicating other than lousy repairs.  While you and I would know what is being done, without probing, on the report I would simply state there was evidence of previous repairs, reason unknown, soft to the touch, rot likely present, things like that.

Lyn - one might think so!  I but am never a meanie, even when some schmuck desperately deserves to have his neck wrung.  I am formidable in two self-defense disciplines, however, so if someone tried to do something to me, well, I am formidable...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

The Nannie Ladder Jay. So what your implying is that having a set of universal minimum standards is somehow over bearing. An interesting opinion. I see it as giving everyone involved in the home inspection process a level of certain expectations. It protects the inspector and the consumer. The inspection industry in Connecticut has improved due to licensing and those Standards. It can still stand improvement, but has at least gone in an improved direction. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 3 years ago

I think the associations are QUITE capable, and experienced enough, to have their own standards that protect the inspector and the consumer.  You know where I am always ("they" never say we should say never or always) going to fall when it comes to some bureaucrat telling me what I should do when I already know what I am doing.  I'm not sure that is an opinion, but it is my view.   It's fine if yours differs.

And I think the associations improve all the time.  I expect inmprovement will continue to be their direction. 

There!  I used your words!  A Scout is courteous.

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Disagree Jay. Associations have no authority. A consumer has no recourse with an association. Your view sounds a lot like something I have been hearing from the head of one association. Hmmm. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 3 years ago

BTW, the CT regs are very closely based on one associations SoP. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 3 years ago

The consumer's only recourse is legal.  I know a termite company here that has changed it's name many times.  State controlled too!

Not knowing (or caring) what any head of any association has been saying in this regard, I would say my views sound a lot like Zadock Magruder.

As a person of integrity, I am my most fierce critic, enforcer and advocate.  I expect you are too.  If a consumer hires anyone in any industry with less than that integrity caveat emptor.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

With licensing that termite company should / would eventually never be able to operate. A license is attached directly to an individual. Here contractors have to register their business with the State and pay a yearly fee. The bad ones do exactly the same as your termite company. Its easy when you aren't tracking the individual business owner only the business entity.  

Caveat emptor? Sometimes due diligence isn't enough. Frankly that's a diaper load. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 3 years ago

There is licensing Jim!  With the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation and each county!  Virginia is a caveat emptor state - no disclosures necessary in real estate.  It is what it is.

I bet there are 100 home inspectors within 20 miles of my house.  And they are all "licensed!"  They simply passed a test!  Get in trouble, just change your business name!

One "custom" builder changed his name from Long Life Builders to Life Long Builders.  Pretty common.  And a joke.  It is what it is.  There is a flipper here who I am told has a contract out on me.  Who knows if it's true - he's taking a long time getting to me.  Apparently I am really mean to him!  But when I'm done, and my clients back out, he just sells to someone else.  No disclosure.  And he's licensed!  Like I said, it's a joke.  It is what it is.

You don't need to respond to my email this morning.  It's easier to call.  And thanks.

Any girl baseball this spring?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

Sounds like the seller was trying to screw up something......or someone.  Glad you brought the screwdriver. Without disclosures in your state (hard to believe), I'll bet that the monkey is really on your back to find all those hidden things that the deceitful sellers are hiding.... with putty and paint. What does that do to litigation for fraud and is hiding defects fraudulent in your state.
Certainly SEEMS dishonest.

Posted by Brad Rachielles, REALTOR, CDPE, Upland, CA (CENTURY 21 Peak, Ca BRE# 01489453) over 3 years ago

Brad - Virginia is a so-called "caveat emptor" state, and there are no disclosures about anything here.  I don't know about litigation issues here, having never been involved.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

A super post I came across among the many archieves and frequent bloggers. Thanks for being apart of Active Rain.-

Posted by Winston Heverly, GRI, ABR, SFR, CDPE, CIAS, PA (Winston Realty, Inc.) over 3 years ago

Thanks Winston, for your very kind words.  I learn a lot on AR.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 3 years ago

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