What I'm Seeing Now

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"So, Which Is Cheaper - Gas Or Electric?"

As a home inspector I get the question all the time about appliances - we'll be looking at the dryer or water heater and they will ask, "So, which is cheaper, gas or electric?"

There are many places and sites that you can go to in this investigation.  And it depends on where you live! 

Electricity in some regions is much cheaper than in others.  And gas overall has come down over the years.

One place I saw the bureaucrat actually said to check to see if you live in an all electric house or neighborhood before you purchase a gas appliance!  Uh, um, okaaaay...

And, when this refers to gas, it means natural gas.  There was no where that looked specifically at liquid propane gas appliances, although the propane market does vary somewhat in price like natural gas.  But overall, the natural gas price usages would likely apply to LP.

One place that seems to investigate everything energy related is a fellow named Michael Bluejay.  I don't know if that's his real name, but his site is complete.  I include him here so I don't get accused of ignoring the environmentalists!

Water Heaters

You have to look at water heaters in terms of Btus (British Thermal Units).  A gallon of water weighs 8.33 pounds.  If the water coming into the house is 60F and you want to raise it to 125F, that's a 65 degree F rise.  So how many Btus does it take to do that?     8.33 x 65 = 541 Btus per gallon.

So, an electric water heater averages 93% efficiency.  So 541 Btus divided by 93% efficiency = 582 Btus to heat a gallon of water.

One kilowatt hour is 3413 Btus, so one Btu is .000293 kilowatts.

Then 582 Btus x .000293 kilowatt hours = .17.  Further, if you have a 50 gallon tank then .17 x 50 = 8.5 kilowatt hours to heat a 50 gallon tank of gas.

My electricity costs me $.09 per kilowatt hour, therefore it would cost me .09 x 8.5 or $1.45 to heat 50 gallons.

The typical gas water heater is 59% efficient.  And doing the same math it takes 890 Btus to heat a gallon of water.  Using the same formulas as above and using my gas cost of $1.032 per therm, it costs $.60 to heat a 50 gallon tank of water.

Comparison:  ELECTRIC costs $1.45 to heat a 50 gallon tank vs. GAS which costs $.60 to heat 50 gallons.

Your costs will vary if your electric or gas rates vary from this example!  But still, gas water heaters cost less than half.

Interestingly he also compares the tankless water heaters.  He says the same thing I said in a blog about them over two years ago!  His words:  "the energy savings are meager, and the payback time could easily be 20 to 40 years."  (Remember, they don't last that long.)  Further, "tankless water heaters promote water waste, are more likely to break down and are more expensive to repair when they do break."  So there!  A little more, "Electric tankless units cost as much or more to run than large gas tanks."  He calls the tankless heaters "hype," and I called them "fabled."

 

Dryers

Consumer Reports compared a typical household large-load electric dryer to a large-load gas dryer.

That would mean a 22000 Btu dryer for gas versus a 5.4KW dryer for electric.

Their numbers?  Using national averages for gas and electric usage, they determined this:

Comparison:  ELECTRIC costs $.95 per load vs. GAS which costs $.23 per load.

Once again, your rates may vary, but gas dryers cost around 1/4 of an electric dryer.

 

Kitchen Ranges

Using Energy Star information, which ranks appliances depending on energy savings, they compared typical kitchen range costs using gas versus electric.

They compared cooking time of one hour at 350 degrees F.  An electric oven needs 2 KW to do that, and a gas oven 0.112 therms.  Using the same national averages for costs they arrive at this:

Comparison:  ELECTRIC costs $.14 per kilowatt hour or $5.94 vs. GAS at 100 Btu which costs $2.34.

And even if your rates vary, a gas oven costs less than half of electric.

 

My recommendation:  do your homework!  If I can do this you can.  Go to different sites and see what you can see.  But when you make your decision, remember, with current information and technologies, the United States alone has enough natural gas to last 92 years.  And in the world another 100 years above that.  So, your gas appliances are likely to have fuel for a while...

 

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 74 commentsJay Markanich • September 15 2013 04:32AM

Comments

Nice explanation here. I have always thought gas was cheaper. Now here is the proof.  Also, when the storms hit you still have gas for cooking and heating when the electricity is off.

Posted by Gary L. Waters Broker Associate, Bucci Realty, Fifteen Years Experience in Brevard County (Bucci Realty, Inc.) almost 7 years ago

Thanks Gary, for considering me the proof!  Gas often works during disasters, unless it is a really huge disaster!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Good morning, Jay. Posts like this, give me gas. - LOL Too bad I can't use it as fuel for my electric water heater!

Posted by TeamCHI - Complete Home Inspections, Inc., Home Inspectons - Nashville, TN area - 615.661.029 (Complete Home Inspections, Inc.) almost 7 years ago

Oh, did you check to see if you have an all electric house Michael?  Only a bureaucrat would say something like that, but alas, that is what we have.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Lucky to have lower juice costs due to a locally owned power company that lowered the rate in Jan and again in April. Have oil fired boiler mate on the hot water zoned furnace but thinking electric water heater is going to be needed to give the boiler a rest in summer and to be more efficient.

Posted by Andrew Mooers | 207.532.6573, Northern Maine Real Estate-Aroostook County Broker (MOOERS REALTY) almost 7 years ago

No, I do have gas heat. At one time, gas was more cost effective in this area. Now it is just about a wash. You know the drill, Big Business = Big Money & Big Profits. Now I am talking like a bureaucrap! - LOL

Posted by TeamCHI - Complete Home Inspections, Inc., Home Inspectons - Nashville, TN area - 615.661.029 (Complete Home Inspections, Inc.) almost 7 years ago

Andrew - certainly our personal costs for utilities play a role here, but still gas will be cheaper than electric.  There are no studies for heating oil that I could find!

Michael - likely if you plug your personal utility costs into the formulas you will find that it is NOT a wash!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Super post, Jay, and suggested, of course.  There are different ways to look at things including "what will my costs be in House A vs. House B" as well as "I live in House A, how can I save costs - short term and long term?"

Posted by Debbie Gartner, The Flooring Girl & Blog Stylist -Dynamo Marketers (The Flooring Girl) almost 7 years ago

That must be above my pay grade Debbie, because I'm not understanding.  Why would different houses cost more or less?  But thanks!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Electricity is more costly than natural gas, especially in CT. $.09 a Kw hour!? You guys in VA have it good. We have 2 major electric utility companies in Ct, plus a few small local companies. I am fortunate and live in a town with a private company. My rate is about $.11. The others are $.17 and .22. 

As for propane it is much more expensive than natural gas in CT and more than fuel oil, a very common energy source here. 

One type of water heater that I think is better than all, I have one, is an indirect. You must have a boiler to have an indirect water heater. From what I understand forced air is the predominate type of heating system throughout the country, so indirect water heaters are probably a localized type. 

My last gas bill for the summer was just under $30. That includes all fees. My usage is practically nothing. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Yo, Jim!  I buy the small propane tanks for my deck grill so I don't know about those rates so much.  But I expect the market is just as variable as for other petrofuels.  I see many water heaters here which double as boilers, providing forced-air heat along with hot water.  I guess that would qualify as a form of indirect.  My gas bill, annualized budget plan, is $110/month.  That's two furnaces, 75 gal water and cook top.  So we use gas all year.  We are frugal though.

I don't know what the national average is for electricity, so I used mine.  But I have a gas water heater too, so it was a good exercise for me!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

This is exactly what I need. Thanks Jay. I am reblogging it. Oh, i just noticed today...active brain.. very clever title!!

Posted by Paula Bradfield, Your Salida Colorado area Realtor Team (Bradfield Ramsey Group) almost 7 years ago

GOOD MORNING JAY ... well, this just confirms what I see when I pay my utilities bills - I have both gas and electric ... one is triple digits, one is double.  It's good to know how long natural gas supplies will be around!

Posted by Gabrielle Kamahele Rhind, Broker/Owner (KGC Properties LLC, Tucson Property Management & Real Estate) almost 7 years ago

All electric homes to not explode.

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) almost 7 years ago

Paula - thanks for both things!

Gabrielle - it seems to me that long before natural gas runs out we will have come up with some other cheaper form of energy.  Did they imagine nuclear energy in the 1800s?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

I suppose that happens from time to time (the last I remember around here was about 15 year ago in South Riding), but not very often Lenn!

A house did explode in Haymarket 2 summers ago, but that was because of TracPipe and lightning!

Actually I was thinking about your electric penchant while writing this!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Our cost comparisons here run about the same as the example you gave. I have clients ask me about it all the time. To me, a gas furnace just feels a more toasty in the winter than electric heat. 

Posted by Fred Hernden, CMI, Albuquerque area Master Inspector (Superior Home Inspections - Greater Albuquerque Area) almost 7 years ago

That was the original disagreement over heat pumps Fred.  People didn't feel comfortable.  They are much better these days.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

So Jay, what would the numbers look like for electric vs propane? We have very few homes with gas but most with propane.  Another blog post perhaps for those of us in rural areas?

Posted by Paula Bradfield, Your Salida Colorado area Realtor Team (Bradfield Ramsey Group) almost 7 years ago

Nobody is doing those stats Paula and I could not find a national average price for LP.  I would expect similar efficiencies, but can't determine costs!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Adding to Paula's question above, I've been told (have not researched yet) that propane does not burn as hot as natural gas.

Posted by Gabe Sanders, Stuart Florida Real Estate (Real Estate of Florida specializing in Martin County Residential Homes, Condos and Land Sales) almost 7 years ago

Gabe - doing cooking merit badge as a 13 year old, I found my pancakes exploded off my griddle.  The counselor told me, "You're fire is too hot!"  I was amazed at that and did not understand because I thought fire was fire!   Once I moved the griddle things worked better!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Great information in your post, Jay. Unfortunately where we live we don't have natural gas as an option...yet.  I'm going to plug in some numbers for our general area.

Posted by Tom White, Franklin Homes Realty LLC, Franklin TN (Franklin Homes Realty LLC (615) 495-0752 or www.FranklinHomesRealty.com) almost 7 years ago

That's too bad Tom!  By the way, my nephew is getting married in Franklin and I will be there for 1/2 day in late October!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay, we have an all electric home except for a propane tank for the gas fireplace. The propane bills can get pretty high just keeping the family room warm.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA almost 7 years ago

All gas here and over the past 3 years my gas bill has dropped from and average of 28 a month to about 16. I am all smiles.

Posted by Chuck Mixon, Cutler Bay Specialist, GRI, CDPE, BPOR (The Keyes Company) almost 7 years ago

Very interesting, I will keep this in mind.  Thank you for your post. 

Posted by Michael Johnson, "I put your best interests first!" (Michael Johnson Homes) almost 7 years ago
I've always been under the impression that gas is cheaper in electricity. Moreove, in my area, I'm sure it is with most, people tend to prefer gas, especially for cooking.
Posted by Frank Castaldini, Realtor - Homes for Sale in San Francisco (Compass) almost 7 years ago

Only certain fireplaces are energy efficient Mike, and most are not.

Gas has come down generally Chuck, because of all the private fields that are fracking (Texas and North Dakota), contrary to the wishes of the Little Imam.

Glad you like it Michael J.!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Verrrry interesting Mr Jay. So if I'm reading this right, I should get gas lights for all my rooms, Right? 

Posted by Scott Seaton Jr. Bourbonnais Kankakee IL Home Inspector, The Home Inspector With a Heart! (SLS Home Inspections-Bradley Bourbonnais Kankakee Manteno) almost 7 years ago

All the chefs on the cooking shows use gas Frank.  There must be a reason for that!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Scott - when my wife bought an investment property in DC, an 1839 row house, it still had gas lights!  Since it had never been remodeled the gas restrictions did not apply.  When she went to remodel they forced her to take out the lights, and she was very upset!  She wanted the "gas ambience..."

But, yes, you should.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago
Great information. I think, it all varies depending upon the family size, square footage, your everyday requirement, where we live and what time of the year we compare are comparing.
Posted by Sham Pathania (SAVE MAX FIRST CHOICE REAL ESTATE INC.) almost 7 years ago

Jay, are you a math major?  Kidding, LOVE the figures and formulas.  Couldn't help notice a trend - GAS IS CHEAPER.

Posted by Matt Kombrink, Your #1 Source For Real Estate (RE/MAX All Pro) almost 7 years ago

Jay- We were able to heat our jacuzzi with gas heat for so much less than electricity when we lived in Houston. And, I'd much rather cook with gas heat!  

Posted by Kathy Streib, Home Stager - Palm Beach County,FL -561-914-6224 (Room Service Home Staging) almost 7 years ago

The therm or kw cost is the same Sham, no matter the number of people!  However, more people use more energy!

Matt - no way.  But I do understand arithmetic!

I like cooking with gas too Kathy, but I find that many homes with gas availability have electric ranges, all due to preference I guess.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Well you proved the point of why they teach math in high school whether you like it or not....Good post and subject too

Posted by Richie Alan Naggar, agent & author (people first...then business Ran Right Realty ) almost 7 years ago

They taught it when I was in high school Richie.  Not so sure now.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

It is amazing the difference in savings on an electric furnace vs a gas furnace.  Most newer communities in my area are natural gas connected where some neighborhoods built in the 70s and 80s are not.  My home has a gas furnace, and my costs for heating are well under costs for cooling with electric central cooling.

Also, a gas range is a must for me.  I don't care for cooking on an electric range, even though the newer smooth top models are a great improvement over the older coil burner ranges.

My hotwater heater is also gas, and in summer months my gas bill is the MINIMUM my provider can offer, at just over $24/month (summer months usage is only water heater and gas range.)

Natural gas is also a clean burning fuel, and there's an ABUNDANCE of it available to us.  The South Texas shale project is a BOON to the area, despite the controversy over fracking.  Much of the data/propaganda out there telling us that fracking is dangerous to ground water is misguided.

Posted by Kate McQueen, Tailored service for your real estate needs! (CB&A Realtors) almost 7 years ago

I knew that gas water heaters cost less to operate, but I like the quantitive way you estimate the difference.

Posted by Brian Schulman, Lancaster County PA RealEstate Expert 717-951-5552 (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Lancaster PA) almost 7 years ago

Costs of generating electric power are ridiculous.   Natural gas should be the fuel of choice.  Government control will distort real efficiencies.

Posted by Dwight Puntigan, Dwight Puntigan (DRP Realty, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Gas for cooking is a perfect way to control temperatures. In our area, gas would be a slight advantage for heating over electric but  most of that is the utility company greed

Posted by Ed Silva, Central CT Real Estate Broker Serving all equally (RE/MAX Professionals, CT 203-206-0754 ) almost 7 years ago

Thanks Kate.  My 75 gallon water heater costs me about $14/month.  And around here, when all-electric neighborhoods vote to allow gas installation, the gas company will help with costs to service the house and subsidize appliance installation.

Brian - just arithmetic, but it depends on utility rates in your area.

Not will Dwight, does distort!  We could have been energy independent 30 years ago with the right decisions then.  Remember, the Dept of Energy was started to "make" us energy independent in a few years!  That was ... when?

Compare rates Ed.  I bet it's more than a slight advantage.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago
Great info Jay. It does get confusing though. Best, Eli
Posted by Charlotte Luxury Real Estate, Eli Magids (Keller Williams - Ballantyne Area) almost 7 years ago

Jay, in terms of water heaters this can get further complicated by factoring in that both installation and mainetinance of gas water heaters is considerably more expensive than electric and they don't last anywheres near as long.  You will on average change your gas water heater at least twice before you change your electric heater---at least in my area.  The cost of electric heaters over time could be further improved if they were required to have 6" of foam around them instead of 2" :)

Regarding dryers, the single biggest thing you can do to save money drying clothes is to buy a front loader washing machine.

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) almost 7 years ago

Not really Eli!  Gas wins.  Now if only they made nuclear water heaters!

Charlie - the same site I quote here, Bluejay, says that 10-15% can be saved on "older" water heaters, but he doesn't define that.  To my mind they are a thermos.  I don't know how wrapping them saves that much.  The sides are pretty cool!  As to longevity, it seems to me they last about the same.  Around here I see them both 30 years old and older.  My present gas (75 gal) is 15 years old this month.  My previous gas (50 gal) lasted 34.

Front loaders spin so fast they virtually dry the clothes!  I say that to clients all the time.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay, I love your info. I have always loved gas appliances, grew up with them, and have always thought they were more efficient and cheaper to run. Thanks

Posted by Helen and Larry Prier- Re-Max Gateway - Residential Real Estate, Anacortes & surrounding Skagit & Island Counties (RE-MAX Gateway- Residential Real Estate Sales) almost 7 years ago

And it seems like they will continue to be cheaper, H&L, until they come up with fusion or nuclear water heaters!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay, it is fascinating the regional differences of how long things last.  Around here, getting 15 years out of a gas water heater is exceptionally good, while getting 30 years out of electric is the norm.  Because gas heaters have a chimney up the middle that is under constant draft---or pretty much constant draft---additional insulation is of mimimal importance.  However an electric heater can benefit greatly from additional insulation around it.  Not fiberglass though---real insulation.  I added two inches of ridgid high-r sheathing type insulation on my heater and cut electrical use by 40% or more.  If this was done at the factory---at insignifiant additional cost--the operating costs of electric water heaters would be greatly reduced.  Take a piece of even crappy fiberglass batt and tape it to the side of your water heater for a couple of hours and then stick your hand between them if you think it is not loosing much heat :)

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) almost 7 years ago

That's good info Charlie!  Adding that in the factory would inhibit their potential installation in many locations now specked by architects as the heaters would be really fat.  It can always be added later.

Must be your cleaner water up there...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay -- Great analyses and examples. I do get asked this question many, many times along with gas vs. oil for heating, but that's a whole other story. You've made a good point that the cost also is strongly dependent on where you live. Here in CT we have very high electric costs by comparison to other states.  CT has the 2nd highest electricity rates in the US.

Posted by Barbara Altieri, REALTOR-Fairfield County CT Homes/Condos For Sale (Kinard Realty Group Fairfield and New Haven County CT Real Estate) almost 7 years ago

Heating oil usage and prices are regional and so it's hard to compare that to gas or electric Barbara.  I suppose you could do the same analysis with the Btu for oil and cost per therm.  CT needs to get out of the way and deregulate and your prices would go down dramatically.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Wow, never seen anyone break it down but that's a pretty big deal...maybe someday I'll actually have gas at my house. 

Posted by Marc McMaster, Putting my clients before myself (RE/MAX Centre Realty) almost 7 years ago

I have gas at my house after certain meals Marc.  Oh, you meant...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Wow - that's ultimate calculations - and simple conclusion that gas is going to be cheaper than electricity for these appliances. 

By any chance, have you studied when the comparison is between oil and gas? (I know it will be dependent of the price of oil in any specific area - however, what's your take for an average household using gas vs. using oil?)

Posted by Praful Thakkar, Andover, MA: Andover Luxury Homes For Sale (LAER Realty Partners) almost 7 years ago

Jay, I commend you on your thorough and detailed research to answer this often-asked question.  I've Bookmarked this for future reference.  Now will you please build a website comparing gas vs. electric costs in every US zip code?  And what about the difference in cost of a kilowatt derived from a hydro, coal, solar, wind, nuclear, natural gas, geothermal, ethanol and ??  I'll check Bluejay's site for answers.  Rates in CA are high because the public utility companies are required by CA law to use (I think it's) 20% from renewables.

Posted by Lloyd Binen, Silicon Valley Realtor since 1976; 408-373-4411 (Certified Realty Services) almost 7 years ago

Lots of data but the bottom line is looks like gas is the way to go.  :)

Posted by James Dray, Exceptional Agents, Outstanding Results (Fathom Realty) almost 7 years ago

Praful - as I said above, oil is very regional and there are no national averages.  But people can do the same calculations by just plugging in their oil costs per therm.

Lloyd - I doubt zip code has anything to do with it.  My electric company covers people in VA, NC and WV.  The end-use cost we consumers pay is our cost, no matter how a kilowatt is derived.  You are right, states that are deregulated have much cheaper utility costs than regulated states, like CA.  When states get involved the market no longer controls the price.  Renewables are very expensive.  Oil and gas will be renewable for well over 300 years.

That's the way it has always been James.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay, I have your great post in My favorites for last week. Here is the link:

my-favorite-blog-posts-for-last-week-september-9th-to-15th

Posted by Helen and Larry Prier- Re-Max Gateway - Residential Real Estate, Anacortes & surrounding Skagit & Island Counties (RE-MAX Gateway- Residential Real Estate Sales) almost 7 years ago

Thank you Jay!  Not only buyers ask this but I have always wondered myself as well!  Thank you for all the information!

Posted by Lauren Rautenberg, Realtor in Maryland almost 7 years ago

Jay, does the same hold true for propane? We have very little natural gas here in Jacksonville and unfortunately we do not live in a natural gas community.  I am putting in a gas range later this year and would love to think that it is more efficient energy-cost wise! I know it will be more efficient to cook with.

Posted by Sharon Alters, Realtor - Homes for Sale Fleming Island FL (Coldwell Banker Vanguard Realty - 904-673-2308) almost 7 years ago

Thank you Helen!  I was unaware of your posts featuring other posts!  I did know of Pat's as she has featured me before.  But I appreciate this very much. 

Lauren - glad you find this so useful.

I mention this briefly in the post Sharon, and in a couple of the comments.  But there are no such propane studies, so it was not a part of this.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

 

   As usual, good research, good presentation, good information.  I'm amazed that the disparity is that huge!

 

Posted by John J. Woods, Going where no man has gone before - wouldn't you? (Big Dog Press, LLC) almost 7 years ago

John - it could be bigger depending on the utility rates where you live!  Some of the regulated states have very high electric rates.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay, we don't have the option of Natural Gas, but I am considering converting from Oil Heting to a two stage Heat Pump, backed up by a propane heating system.  I would then have the ability to choose a gas range, dryer, water heater (or preferably tankless water heater) and a propane fireplace for aesthetics...

Posted by Chris Smith, South Simcoe, Caledon, King, Orangeville Real Esta (Re/Max Chay Realty Inc., Brokerage) almost 7 years ago

I see those here and they are effecient and effective Chris.  You may want to rethink the tankless water heater thing. 

This is from that Michael Bluejay fellow:  http://michaelbluejay.com/electricity/tankless.html

All that is very similar to my post on tankless heaters a couple of years ago.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay a great blog, so true it depends on your region and cost of utilities. I recently put an AR post together regarding heating a home.... Oil vs. Propane for the Homes.... thought you be interested.

Posted by David Popoff, Realtor®,SRS, Green ~ Fairfield County, Ct (DMK Real Estate ) almost 7 years ago

Thanks David.  I will check it out!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay, you're making me feel really glad that my house is mostly gas!  

Posted by Patricia Kennedy, Home in the Capital (RLAH Real Estate) almost 7 years ago

You should feel good Pat.  Gas is cheaper and will be around for a long time.  There are no substitutes, despite what some say.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) almost 7 years ago

Jay. That is quite comprehensive.  In our area the difference is much larger with cost of electric. We won't even get into Oil vs Gas.

Posted by Grant Schneider, Your Coach Helping You Create Successful Outcomes (Performance Development Strategies) over 6 years ago

I could find no info on oil vs. gas Grant.  I think I said in the post that rates, of course, vary from place to place.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 6 years ago

In many condos here ( Los Angeles county), there is no gas option for appliances, so there is no question what is better. 

Posted by Inna Ivchenko, Realtor® • Green • GRI • HAFA • PSC Calabasas CA (Barcode Properties) about 4 years ago

Wow, you found an oldie but a goodie, Inna!  When there is no choice, there is no choice.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 4 years ago

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