What I'm Seeing Now

head_left_image

Lightning Rods

You might think lightning rods are common, but on residences they are not so common, at least in Northern Virginia.

I see them more and more on schools and commercial buildings with metal roofs.  And I see them on statues, and some Federal buildings.  For example, when the Capitol Building was repainted and refurbished in the 90s, the statue (the image of Columbia) on top was left on the lawn for a while.  When they put it back on top, they added "lightning points" to hopefully send any strike away from it and the building.  There are also "lightning points" on the Washington Monument.  There are many such points on each, tipped with platinum.

Copper and its alloys are the most commonly used metal in lightning rods and points.

The lightning rod was introduced to America in 1749 by Benjamin Franklin.

He called it a "lightning arrestor," but it was commonly referred to thereafter as the Franklin Rod.

He thought lightning was electricity, and that if he sharpened a metal rod into a point and put it on top of a tall building he could prove that.  He said, "The electrical fire would, I think, be drawn out of a cloud silently, before it could come near enough to strike...."

His impatience waiting for the tall steeple of the Christ Church in Philadelphia to be completed spurred him to send up his famous kite and key.  His experiment worked.  Others have died trying to mimic it!

A lightning rod is essentially a metal rod, or rods, mounted on top of a building or high place, and bonded to a cable, or electrical conductor.

This cable is itself connected to a long rod, or electrode, buried deep into the earth.

This is a house wrapped entirely with aluminum siding.

It is located on top of a rural hill at the foot of the "mountains" between Round Hill and Berryville, Virginia.

This house is all by itself.

Being surrounded by an electrical conductor, aluminum siding, the homeowners decided at the outset to equip it with lightning rods.

There are rods all over the house, and all connected to each other and to cables, which themselves are bonded to three electrodes buried around the house.

Lightning, it is hoped, will find the rods preferential to striking the house, and be directed safely into the ground.

The cable is large, and braided.

It is bare.

The bonding is significant, to make sure there is a very solid connection.

And the rod is 10' deep.

The homeowner reports that to their knowledge, over the last 19 years, lightning has never struck the house.

But it is protected!

I do not see this very much.  In fact I can't remember the last time I have seen such an array of lightning rods!

Certainly it is good to see!

My recommendation:  it's good to see a lightning rod where it can be of use!  Again, I do not see them very often on residential structures.  They are becoming more and more popular for commercial use however.  And that, perhaps, because of the sensitive electronic equipment and computers in modern structures.  When a building is alone and lightning vulnerable, like this one is, perhaps a lightning rod or two (or ten!) would be a good way to go!

 

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 72 commentsJay Markanich • May 10 2013 03:24AM

Comments

A home in Purcellville/Hillsboro could have benefited by a lightening rod. 

In a fierce storm about a year and a half ago, lightening struck a Propane tank attached to one side of the house and the tank exploded. 

The house was a complete loss.  The owners have completely rebuilt.  I sure hope they installed a lightening rod. 

I've never been closer than about 400 yards to the house.  My view is from my gunsmiths house. 

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Maybe you could send them this blog Lenn!  Or print it, deliver it to your gunsmith, and, hoping he doesn't have your 400 yard rule, he could deliver it to them!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Here it is a "days gone by" kind of thing and some were quite architechturally attractive and are considered collectable.

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Real Estate Agents - Luxury - Divorce (EXP Realty 414-525-0563) over 7 years ago

Jay.  The "400 yard" reference was simply to say that I haven't been close enough to the house to determine whether or not the new structure has lightening rods.

I have to visit my gunsmith today so I'll look through some binoculars.

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Thanks so much for all the history on lightning rods.  I could have sworn that we had one in the house I grew up in. 

Posted by Debbie Gartner, The Flooring Girl & Blog Stylist -Dynamo Marketers (The Flooring Girl) over 7 years ago

That's right S&D!  The glass balls with filials are very collectible.

There is no lightning in the outlook today Lenn, so you are probably safe to go snooping around!

Maybe you did Debbie.  I am not familiar at all looking for them in other areas of the country.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Lived in Connecticut in the 60's. House had lightning rods on the roof for sure. Thanks for the history.

Posted by Bill Reddington, Destin Florida Real Estate (Re/max By The Sea) over 7 years ago

Would they still be there Bill?  Is this a common practice there?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Good morning Jay.  What an en-lightning post.  Strikes me very interesting.

Posted by Kenneth Cole, NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson (Weichert Realtors Appleseed Group, 2043 Richmond Ave. S.I.N.Y. 10314. office phone 718-698-9797, Appleseedhomes.com -) over 7 years ago

Go fly a kite Ken!

 

;>)

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay;  thanks for the laugh

Posted by Kenneth Cole, NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson (Weichert Realtors Appleseed Group, 2043 Richmond Ave. S.I.N.Y. 10314. office phone 718-698-9797, Appleseedhomes.com -) over 7 years ago

Well, I thought you'd get it.  You knew Franklin, I didn't.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Saw a set on the house I inspcted the other morning. Like you, I don't see them often.

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 7 years ago

This was an impressive array, Jim, with the bonded cables running inside and outside the house.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Have lightning rods on a set of farm buildings we own...the insurance company liked them a lot when first installed.

maine farm buildings photo

Posted by Andrew Mooers | 207.532.6573, Northern Maine Real Estate-Aroostook County Broker (MOOERS REALTY) over 7 years ago

Great blog.  Lightning rods are often forgotten but so useful!

Posted by Ricki Eichler McCallum, Broker,GRI,ABR, e-Pro, TAHS (CastNet Realty) over 7 years ago

Hi Jay,

I don't get to see these at all here. in Michigan they were installed all over the place. No matter the buildings they were there.

But here....none at all.

Have a great day in Bristow my friend.

Best, Clint McKie

Posted by Clint Mckie, Desert Sun Home, Comm. Inspection 1-575-706-5586 (Desert Sun Home, commercial Inspections) over 7 years ago

Thanks, Jay, for sharing your experience and your photographs. We do not see many lightning rods in urban area neighborhoods.

Posted by Roy Kelley (Realty Group Referrals) over 7 years ago

Andrew - I am sure insurance companies like them very much!  And you are wise.

Thanks Ricki.  Glad you enjoyed the blog!

Clint - isn't that tornado territory up there, or at least riddled with powerful thunderstorms?

You're welcome Roy.  You are right, we do not.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Hmmm, I wonder, instead of putting them in the ground, you could harness all that free power to charge your Iphone or something during a thunderstorm :)

Posted by Joshua Frederick, Home Inspector in Defiance & all of Northwest Ohio (Home Inspector for ASPEC Residential Services, LLC) over 7 years ago

Would be nice to capture future electricity, huh Joshua!?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay, several years ago we lived in Winchester in a house with a metal roof. I learned the hard way about lightening rods when my TV antenna did the job very well.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA over 7 years ago

All I can say. .that is a good lightning rod salesman out there. .

he should do real estate!

Posted by Fernando Herboso - Broker for Maxus Realty Group, 301-246-0001 Serving Maryland, DC and Northern VA (Maxus Realty Group - Broker 301-246-0001) over 7 years ago

Strangely enough, I have never seen them here. And all I hear is that we are the lightning capital of the world.... something just don't sound right there! Most people use gazillion joules surge protectors on their electronic equipment, but haven't seen lightning rods, just ground rods on the electrical panels.

Just wondering how you checked to see how long that rod went into the ground... did you dig a hole beside it and measure it?

:-)

Posted by Fred Hernden, CMI, Albuquerque area Master Inspector (Superior Home Inspections - Greater Albuquerque Area) over 7 years ago

That was, in fact, the lightning rod Mike!

I think these homeowners were the impetus behind the rods here Fernando.  I expect a roofer installed them.

X-Ray vision Fred.  Well, I might have asked the homeowner, but don't tell anyone, OK?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

I do not see any house with Lighting rods in New Jersey.  For here it is not necessary, unless you have a tall commercial building as you mentioned.

Posted by Keith Lawrence, ABR, SFR (Christie's International) over 7 years ago

In addition to my life as a REALTOR, I manage a company between Lexington and Louisville, KY called Bluegrass Lightning Consultants.  You can check out the website here: www.bluegrasslightning.com.  Though we are located in Kentucky, we will travel for large jobs, and have worked on several in Virginia and all over the south.  Lightning protection is a great thing when done correctly, and I want everyone to know that it is very important that your contractor is licenced to install lightning protection systems by either LPI, UL or both.  Since we are experts in the field of Lightning Protection, I will soon be bloging on the subject here and elswhere.  It is great to see people talking about this, and if anyone has any questions please feel free to contact us (or me directly) no matter where you are in the country we are always happy to help inform people about the benefits of lighting protection, and another aspect of that not directly mentioned here, whole house surge protection. Together, a lightning protection system with whole house surge, can virtually eliminate lighting risk to a structure and its contents.  Your are correct in stating that it is popular for commercial properties, we also do a large number of schools, hospitals, public facilties, prisons, and in our area large estates, and horse farms.  We have even protected high value trees on some of these large estates.  Thanks for posting on this topic, lighting protection for homes is a great thing, and it works.    

Posted by Nathan Jones (McClellan Gray Real Estate, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay, I used to see lighting rods occasionally growing up in Leesburg but, that was long before it was the city that it is now. I can't recall a time I've seen them on a house in Alexandria. Sounds like given the setting of the house in Berryville it was a smart move.

Posted by Amanda S. Davidson, Alexandria Virginia Homes For Sale (Amanda Davidson Real Estate Group Brokered By eXp Realty) over 7 years ago

Jay, since these systems represent a "metallic system" that is part of the structure, do you know if they have to be connected to the house EGC?

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) over 7 years ago

Don't see lightning rods here very much but then again we don't get much lightning. Got any tips for boats, we have a had a few close calls in the past with masts and floating on water. Not a great combination.

Posted by Helen and Larry Prier- Re-Max Gateway - Residential Real Estate, Anacortes & surrounding Skagit & Island Counties (RE-MAX Gateway- Residential Real Estate Sales) over 7 years ago

I had a tree in front of my house get struck by lightning in the middle of the night once.  That will definitely wake you up.  Killed the tree too.

Posted by Marc McMaster, Putting my clients before myself (RE/MAX Centre Realty) over 7 years ago

Jay -- owned some property in Central Oregon - and the large Ponderosa Pine acted as lightning rod -- could see where the lightning went down the tree - from the path of blasted out bark.  We installed ground wire to our television antenna for safety.

Posted by Steven Cook (No Longer Processing Mortgages.) over 7 years ago

This is a new one for me Jay, course we don't have the lightning storms that other areas have. Very informative!

Posted by Tom Arstingstall, General Contractor, Dry Rot, Water Damage Sacramento, El Dorado County - (916) 765-5366, General Contractor, Dry Rot and Water Damage (Dry Rot and Water Damage www.tromlerconstruction.com Mobile - 916-765-5366) over 7 years ago

Very cool - would feel pretty comfortable in that house during a lightning storm. :)

Posted by Jon Karlen, Louisville & Shelbyville Kentucky real estate (Finish Line Realty - Shelbyville & Louisville Ky Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Keith - they are more popular on very old houses.  And not very common in your area either!

Thanks Nathan.  This house had a surge protector in each panel box as well.

Amanda - probably on those older houses.  I haven't looked for them lately, but might start.  None in Alex?

Charlie - do you mean the Electric Guitar Controls?  These cables were over the roof, inside the attic, and attached to the aluminum siding all the way down to all three electrodes.  I wonder why the house doesn't light up!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

H&L - I wouldn't know what to do about or for boats!

Marc - there are many trees around here blasted apart by lightning!

Steven - pine needles actually act as a zillion diffusers to disperse lightning.

How is it that you all escape Tom?  Must be special!

Jon - apparently so!  I expect the system works - it is intricately fitted together.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

jay, i had 2 houses struck with lightning and we could not find anyone to do the lightning rods...it was so frustrating.  Always sold the homes!  Can't beat them, run from them!

Posted by Ginny Gorman, Homes for Sale in Southern RI and beyond (RI Real Estate Services ~ 401-529-7849~ RI Waterfront Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Jay - very interesting post. Manhattan with its tall buildings is where lightning rods are commonly found in my area.

Posted by Eric Middleton, Professional Property Inspector (Closer Look Property Inspections Inc.) over 7 years ago

So, that's what those are.  I saw some homes with those on their roofs on my trip around the West last year.  Couldn't figure it out for the life of me.  I live in an area where we don't have electrical storms, although coming from the midwest as a child, I remember them very well.

Posted by Gary Frimann, CRS, GRI, REALTOR and Broker (Eagle Ridge Realty / Signature Homes & Estates) over 7 years ago

Morning Jay I see another ho hum feature is yours.  Do you think the owners did an overkill? 

Posted by James Dray, Exceptional Agents, Outstanding Results (Fathom Realty) over 7 years ago

Ginny - yikes!  You must be a human conductor!  I expect finding someone is difficult if you are in an area where they are not common.

Eric - I have seen many photos of the Empire State Building struck by a lightning bolt.  Obviously that gets conducted somewhere!

And now you know Gary!  It might be that in some areas insurance companies like to see them.

James - they have to be done with great specificity and distance between the rods.  So no overkill here - the house size and design demands how many it gets.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Good morning Jay,

Congrats on the featured post..excellent information. There have been two homes on one street in our community that have been struck by lightning.....trust me both homeowners now have lightning rod protection (and so do their neighbors).

Posted by Dorie Dillard CRS GRI ABR, Serving Buyers & Sellers in NW Austin Real Estate (Coldwell Banker Realty ~ 512.750.6899) over 7 years ago

Cool, I've never seen one myself.  Thanks for sharing

Posted by Rafi Footerman, Home Inspector, Mold Inspector, Radon and More! (Mid Jersey Inspections) over 7 years ago

Maybe Nathan Jones can join back in the comment, and tell us if this rod is installed properly? I was going to question if it was okay for the conducter leading to the grounding rod  to be in contact with the aluminum siding, or maybe it has insulators keeping it off of it, that arent visible in the picture. Either way Jay very interesting post, most definetly not seen too often, and will prompt me to educate myself about these systems.

                                                                          Thanks,

                                                                     John Holmes,

                                                    Inspector Holmes Home Inspections

                                                    Protecting Your Biggest Investment

                                                  Proudly Serving Long Island New York

                                 visit me @     www.linyhomeinspection.com

Posted by New York HOME INSPECTOR Inspector Holmes, John Holmes (http://www.linyhomeinspection.com ) over 7 years ago

Dorie -life experience is a cruel but effective teacher!

Rafi - every now and then.  The schools here all have them.

John - I have noticed the schools here with metal roofs that all have lightning rods also have the cables attached to the aluminum siding on they way to the ground.  Some of the rods on this house are literally bolted to the roof.  Some pass through and the cable is inside the attic.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Lightning rods can be found more frequently in the Dallas area, due to the number of electrical storms we experience. 

Posted by Sharon Parisi, Dallas Homes (United Real Estate Dallas ) over 7 years ago

Good to know Sharon.  I am surprised they are not so common in Florida!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

I should talk to my insurance agent to see if there is a difference in rates with and without a rod.

Posted by Dwight Puntigan, Dwight Puntigan (DRP Realty, LLC) over 7 years ago

John, it is acceptable for the lightning protection to be in contact with aluminum siding.  Metal building materials like siding, should be "bonded" to the system, like this.  From the pictures I do see that the aluminum to copper transition is a little low to the ground , supposed to be minimum 2' above grade.  Other things to look for as an inspector would be to make sure the water, gas, and utilities are bonded to the LP system grounds, very important.

Posted by Nathan Jones (McClellan Gray Real Estate, LLC) over 7 years ago

Good thinking Dwight!  I don't know about my house.

Nathan - that was my understanding too.  In this case the electrode is above the soil, but a bit buried by mulch.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay, 

Interesting topic! I can't recall a home being struck by lighting here in AZ, but I can't see why it couldn't. More and more homes are using metal roofs and copper to boot. Seems to me, those would be perfect homes for lightning rods.

Posted by Sheri Sperry - MCNE®, (928) 274-7355 ~ YOUR Solutions REALTOR® (Coldwell Banker Realty) over 7 years ago

Metal roofs are very long lasting Sheri, and are great additions to a house.  But they have to be protected.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Even though we only rarely have electrical storms, lightning strikes happen here as well.  A local restaurant in our community was struck last year and what seemed so strange to me was that it was quite close to a much higher theater building.  It just seemed so random - not sure that lightning rods would have made much of a difference.

Posted by Michael J. O'Connor, Eastvale - 951-847-4883 (Diamond Ridge Realty) over 7 years ago

Great info thanks. My building was struck once & totaled out a couple of appliances. Melted my neighbors phone in the cradle in her kitchen.

Posted by Lyn Sims, Schaumburg Real Estate (RE/MAX Suburban) over 7 years ago

Of course lightning strikes happen Michael!  There was something at that restaurant which attracted the lightning.

Lyn - DON'T be on the phone during a thunderstorm!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Lightning struck VERY close to my house a couple of years ago. I was driving home and heard the thunder-clap as i was a couple of blocks away. You could smell something burning as soon as I walked in the door. Insurance paid for the electronics and water heater, but not a.c. Looks like I'll need to check on a Lightning rod (near top of a hill).

Posted by Travis "the SOLD man" Parker; Broker/Owner, email: Travis@theSOLDman.me / cell: 334-494-7846 (Travis Realty) over 7 years ago

There you go Travis!  Or put it on top of a nearby church steeple like Franklin wanted to do!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago
A tall old growth Redwood tree was a lightning rod during our last storm. It burned from the inside out after the strike. These trees are do full of water, it attracts strikes.
Posted by Hella Mitschke Rothwell, Hawaii & California Real Estate Broker ((831) 626-4000) over 7 years ago

Thanks Jay, this is interesting. Lightning rods aren't something we ever hear about here. Now I'll be looking to see if they're installed on any commercial buildings.

I've never heard of a house here being struck by lightning, but my son the power lineman has had to travel to central Washington a couple of times to replace transformers or ground wires that were destroyed by lightning.

Posted by Marte Cliff, Your real estate writer (Marte Cliff Copywriting) over 7 years ago

Hi Jay, they are much more common here in central Florida, especially on rural properties.

Posted by Bob Miller, The Ocala Dream Team (Keller Williams Cornerstone Realty) over 7 years ago

Interesting post Jay! I've always wondered if these things really worked?

Posted by Mitch Muller - Charlotte NC Real Estate, Certified Residential Specialist (ProStead Realty Charlotte, NC CRS SRES mitch@prostead.com) over 7 years ago

Thank you Jay!  Considering Florida is so well known for its lighting, I don't believe that I've seen them there, either.  Interesting and thought-provoking post.  As Dwight mentioned, I wonder if it does affect insurance rates?

Posted by Christi Farrington, ~ Your representative in Fairfield County, CT (Dagny's Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Hela - a redwood full of water would be quite the conductor!

Marte - a client's house was struck a few years ago, and it left a huge hole in the roof and two upstairs bedrooms before it exited out the side of the house.

That's good information Bob!  Another Florida inspector has not seen them!

They must Mitch!  Or they would not still be used.

Don't know about the insurance Christi, but Florida is lightning alley!

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Hi Jay -- very interesting. I have a quick question can you explain the difference between the lightening rod and the grounding wire?  Thanks so much.

Posted by Joan Whitebook, Consumer Focused Real Estate Services (BHG The Masiello Group) over 7 years ago
Michael: I had heard that it was not a good idea to be on the telephone during a lightening strike. Yes I had better heed that advice.
Posted by Evelyn Kennedy, Alameda, Real Estate, Alameda, CA (Alain Pinel Realtors) over 7 years ago

Joan - the rod sits a bit higher and is intended to attract the lightning, which the cable and ground wire hopefully send straight into the ground.

Evelyn - people are actually killed that way!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

That's correct Ryan, hence the name "lightning attractors."

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Not sure of the cost effectiveness, but it seems like a cheap and common sense solution to what could be a big problem.

Posted by Gene Riemenschneider, Turning Houses into Homes (Home Point Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Not to many inspectors know about the lightning rod. I had one inspection where the inspector even recommended removing the rod, can you believe that. 

Since they are required in Germany I know exactly what you are talking about. Wish some home inspectors actually know what lightning rods are and their purpose. 

Great Post.

Posted by Annett T. Block, Your NextHome in Fort Lauderdale Beach (NextHome Connect Realty) over 7 years ago

Gene - these systems have been around for a long time, and that because they work!

Annett - thank you!  I would like to see more, especially on houses with metal roofs!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Great advice as usual. We Cali's take so much for granted and never even think about these issues.

Posted by John DL Arendsen, Crest Backyard Homes "ADU" dealer & Contractor (CREST BACKYARD HOMES, ON THE LEVEL GENERAL & FACTORY BUILT HOME CONTRACTOR, TAG REAL ESTATE SALES & INVESTMENTS) over 7 years ago

Thanks John.  Glad you enjoyed the post!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

This blog does not allow anonymous comments