What I'm Seeing Now

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Improperly Distributed Weight

One of the most important things to look for in a pre-drywall inspection is improperly distributed weight. 

But the same is true of new work done on older homes!

Beautifully constructed, this apparent, turn-of-the-last-century Victorian Sears Catalog home has a signature wrap around front porch.  Porches were essential to get out of the house during hot summer evenings, hoping the cooling evening air would clear some of the day's heat build up from indoors.

Necessarily, to support the load, there are numerous columns.  Decoratively "DORIC," they are also essential, and distanced to hold their calculated load.

However, while the columns themselves look original, each of them has a newer, square wood base and four aluminum feet, ostensibly to separate them from the decking and keep them from rotting.  I suspect that at some point the previous, if not original, base on each column had been replaced in favor of this system.  Someone had understood that modern deck columns should be separated from their concrete bases with some kind of metal foot, so why wouldn't it work here?

See the stress? 

QUESTION:  each aluminum foot has four points, which makes 16 load points per column.  How much of the load above does each of those 16 points carry?  When you are standing on a scale, or your dog is standing on the scale at the vet's office, how much of the weight is handled by each foot?

ANSWER:  ALL OF IT!

Properly supported underneath by brick structures, each column's load is eventually transferred to the ground.  Ultimately, there is plenty of support.  But the columns are separated from that support by wood - decking, trim and joist.  You can see that at some previous time the attempt was made to shore things up with pressure-treated wood.  But not all.  And therefore the stress!

As the load is carried onto 16 VERY SMALL points, each will push in as the wood underneath softens with time.  Why does it soften?  Water!  Little of the wood under the columns is pressure treated.  The points push into it. And it is rotting.

Virtually every column showed some stress, but those on the side that gets the most direct weather were the worst.  Of course!

My recommendation:  what I do is observe and report.  I don't evaluate, determine courses of action, or even, in my report, offer my conclusion as to what I think is going on here.  THE BEST I CAN DO FOR MY CLIENT AT THIS POINT IS REFER THIS FOR OTHER PROFESSIONAL OPINION, AND THEREFORE TO A STRUCTURAL ENGINEER'S EVALUATION.  And certainly throw in a couple of photographs of what I am referring to in the report!  From here decisions need to be made and a course of action decided upon.

 

Note:  everyone knows that there are no guard/handrails on either staircase and that the deck is high off the ground so guardrails are really needed there too.  The one end of the porch is about 5' high!  That's a good fall for anybody.  This post is not to make that point.

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 80 commentsJay Markanich • June 20 2012 02:30AM

Comments

Hi Jay, that house looks like it is slowing settling like my old body! lol

Posted by Bob Miller, The Ocala Dream Team (Keller Williams Cornerstone Realty) over 5 years ago

Bob - everything, and apparently everyone, settles with time!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

That does not look good at all.  It seems like the weight needs to be spread and it's ironic as it's set up...it may be faciliating water and rot damage in the wood below.

Posted by Debbie Gartner, The Flooring Girl & Blog Stylist -Dynamo Marketers (The Flooring Girl) over 5 years ago

Jay, for a minute there, I thought your post was about weight loss!  Coffee hasn't kicked in yet I guess!

 I see a lot of historical homes with the posts in certain communities - some do look like they are leaning. I am going to be listing a home from 1908 that has columns across the front porch.  Thankfully, it does not appear to be leaning...yet!

Posted by Lorena McMullen, Serving SE Michigan (3DX Real Estate) over 5 years ago

Looks like that to me Debbie.  I don't know how long these columns have been supported like this, but it's a problem now.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Leaning is another problem that is common with some columns Lorena.  You should look for that when you list the house.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Good morning Jay.  Your explanations with supporting photographs makes it very easy to understand.  I bet your clients appreciate your skill.  Have a great day!

Posted by Linda Blumenthal, CBR - Certified Buyers Representative (The Corcoran Group - Sales Agent - 631-466-4087) over 5 years ago

The engineer did his inspection and I have the written report and estimate for repair.

Whew!  

While I tend to be over cautious towards protecting a buyer's interest, as I know that you are also, the engineer's report is positive and the cost to install blocking between the wood porch columns and the brick foundation columns is minimal. 

I'll speak with the buyers this a.m. but I suspect that we'll be moving forward to settlement. 

The only thing left is the matter of the numerous "pests" in the house with the pest company warranty.

What an adventure this one was.

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 5 years ago

Jay, Our home had a front porch/deck that the original builder didn't adequately provide foundation for the columns.  For us, we removed all of it and went to a totally different style and we're much happier with the end result.

Posted by Liz and Bill Spear, RE/MAX Elite Warren County OH (Cincinnati/Dayton) (RE/MAX Elite 513.520.5305 www.LizTour.com) over 5 years ago

The load has to find it's way to the ground. It's best that it goes to the ground via structure and not falling to the ground.

Posted by Rob Ernst, Reno, NV-775-410-4286 Inspector & Energy Auditor (Certified Structure Inspector) over 5 years ago

Thanks Linda.  The idea is to try to see as much as possible!

Lenn - that is good news and pretty much what we discussed.  But, like we also discussed, it could have gone either way on cost!  As to the pest warranty, well, you and I think alike.

Bliz - that's why they call it "foundation!"  Posts need to be founded!

Rob - there was a little play between post and brick, but there was good structure here.  Those feet sure poked into the wood though!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

I thought that the Aluminum spacers were only for wood-concrete installations? I wonder who talked them into that installation in the forst place?

Posted by Richard Weisser, Richard Weisser Retired Real Estate Professional (Richard Weisser Realty) over 5 years ago

They are Richard.  I think whoever did this knew about them, but did not understand proper application.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Good morning Jay. A scary story and the pictures drive it home. Why get professional advice if you don't intend to follow it.

Posted by Sheila Anderson, The Real Estate Whisperer Who Listens 732-715-1133 (Referral Group Incorporated) over 5 years ago

Such a shame that this "detail" caused so many problems for this house.  It is lovely but it does not take much to see the problems caused by those aluminum points.

Posted by Kathryn Maguire, Serving Chesapeake, Norfolk, VA Beach (GreatNorfolkHomes.com (757) 560-0881) over 5 years ago

Good morning Jay another featured post.  Man you need to gather all of these up and write a book on the do's and don'ts of home construction, upgrades etc. 

Posted by James Dray, Exceptional Agents, Outstanding Results (Fathom Realty AR LLC) over 5 years ago

Jay - While the repair may not be terribly expensive, I'm surprised the seller would market the home with such an obvious problem.

Posted by John Mulkey, Housing Guru (TheHousingGuru.com) over 5 years ago
As an engineer myself, I've observed many cases of honest good intentions having unintended results. There are just so many variables in any given situation that it is easy for someone who hasn't had the training to miss these things. Your post touches very nicely on the problem- the full load path hadn't been considered when these new columns were installed.
Posted by Mark Delgado, Benicia and Vallejo, Property Management, rental h (houses for rent, Solano County & Glen Cove) over 5 years ago

Jay, they went through a lot of effort to put in the Aluminum spacers, but not a very good idea. Looks like Lenn has found a fix and it will be repaired correctly.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA over 5 years ago

Such a nice looking home to have a potential  major issue like this. Good thing for the owners - you have observed and recommended further evaluation.

Posted by Gary L. Waters, Broker Owner, Waters Realty of Brevard, LLC, ... a small office, delivering big service! (Waters Realty of Brevard, LLC) over 5 years ago

Jay, congrats on the feature. Very good post and good info. It sounds like you and Lenn have had fun on this one between the porch and Julius. Weight distribution is so very important. In my previous life as a Mack Truck dealer it was paramount. The biggest problem we had is that with a large truck improper distribution is not visual very often.

Posted by Tom Bailey (Margaret Rudd & Associates Inc.) over 5 years ago

Jay - The stress demonstrated under those columns is downright frightening.  I also suspect the right construction person could fix that easier than some issues we come up against.  Love the overall look of that old home.  That porch is a dream!

Posted by Myrl Jeffcoat, Greater Sacramento Real Estate Agent (GreatWest Realty) over 5 years ago

Proper weight distribution is so important to any structure, and the heavier the load the wider the base. One of the reason I always try to keep both feet firmly planted

Posted by Ed Silva, Central CT Real Estate Broker Serving all equally (RE/MAX Professionals, CT 203-206-0754 ) over 5 years ago

Great pictures, great comment too. Observe and report. I am just here to report on the condition. I get agents and clients occasionally asking me "If I do this will it pass your inspection?" I have to remind them I'm not passing or failing. Just reporting what I see. 

Posted by Scott Seaton Jr. Bourbonnais Kankakee IL Home Inspector, The Home Inspector With a Heart! (SLS Home Inspections-Bradley Bourbonnais Kankakee Manteno) over 5 years ago

Jay and Lenn make the point of how important it is to have professional and competent people involved in your Real Estate Transaction...

Posted by Richie Alan Naggar, agent & author (people first...then business Ran Right Realty ) over 5 years ago

Looked great from far away. On my personal house the frame put a load bearing wall right between floor joists. He knew it and didn't say anything and the city inspectors missed it. Now I am cutting a 23 foot long hole in my ceiling to add another floor joist to correct the problem. (Not to mention all the HVAC and plumbing modifications necessary to get the joist in. Just a good thing I can do it.

Posted by Than Maynard, Broker - Licensed to List & Sell - 405-990-8862 (Coldwell Banker Heart of Oklahoma) over 5 years ago

Looks like a great older home, that with the observations you have made and the right TLC someone could come to really love.

Posted by Bill Rozek, NMLS #214260 (Embrace Home Loans, Inc.) over 5 years ago

Jay I'm sure the buyers are grateful that you pointed that out...at least they know what to do and that Lenn had the buyers follow your advice.  See you later today Jay!

Posted by Cheryl Thomson, REALTOR, U.S Army-Veteran, Real Estate in Northern Virginia (Jobin Realty (703.216.5635) cheryltee47@gmail.com) over 5 years ago

I LOVE the regal appearance of the columns....good to know for your buyers that beauty on the outside still requires careful examination.

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Realtors - Luxury - Divorce - Short Sale (Keller Williams 414-525-0563) over 5 years ago

That makes me heart-sick.  Such a beautiful house.  I know you must be able to separate your feelings about a beautiful home into small, inter-related parts that add up to what is really is, no emotion attached.

Posted by Joetta Fort, Independent Broker, Homes Denver to Boulder (The DiGiorgio Group) over 5 years ago

Jay, I like the way you do things by the numbers, you and Lenn make a good team along with the other professionals that were brought in to evaluate and do the repairs. Thanks,

Posted by Adrian Willanger, Profit from my two decades of experience (206 909-7536 AdrianWillanger-broker.com) over 5 years ago

Those pictures definitely show that those columns are really holding up some weight and that the floor looks like it's starting to lose some of its strength. 

Posted by Eileen Hsu, LICENSED REAL ESTATE SALESPERSON (Douglas Elliman Real Estate) over 5 years ago

I'm curious about the Sears catalog reference. What is that?

Posted by Dave Halpern, Louisville Short Sale Expert (Keller Williams Realty Louisville East (502) 664-7827) over 5 years ago

Thanks for the great post, you just pointed out another reason clients should get a home inspection, agents just aren't armed with the same information you have.

 

Thanks and have a great day

Posted by Doris Freeman, Broker/Agent, Realtor, Madison-Gibson-Crockett (RE/MAX REALTY SOURCE) over 5 years ago

Jay -- your weight/scale reference might have tied in better, if you had compared to both feet flat on the scale versus standing on ball of one foot.  Same amount of weight, much smaller area it is spread over.

Posted by Steven Cook (No Longer Processing Mortgages.) over 5 years ago

I love the look of this home, we don't have these Grand Dames in California. But....so glad to know that the cost to repair is small, so beautiful a home. Good for you....and Lenn's buyers.

Posted by Karen Fiddler, Broker/Owner, Orange County & Lake Arrowhead, CA (949)510-2395 (Karen Parsons-Fiddler, Broker 949-510-2395) over 5 years ago

Jay, great information.  I might have missed this in the past, but your post, with the pictures and the explanation has made the issue crystal clear to me.

Posted by Chris Smith, South Simcoe, Caledon, King, Orangeville Real Esta (Re/Max Chay Realty Inc., Brokerage) over 5 years ago

Jay, if you ever want to relocate to Oklahoma City i want you to know you are welcome here. We could sure use you and the way you observe and advise.

Posted by Joe Pryor, REALTOR® - Oklahoma Investment Properties (The Virtual Real Estate Team) over 5 years ago

Jay:

What a gorgeous house.  Good think the buyers have you as their inspector.  You catch everything. 

Posted by Evelyn Kennedy, Alameda, Real Estate, Alameda, CA (Alain Pinel Realtors) over 5 years ago

Thanks Sheila.  I think this is a problem that has be coming along nicely for years!

Kathryn - they obviously had problems in the past with those columns and thought they were taking care of it!

James - I would love to but I need to find the publisher who would take on my project!

John - I agree.  They had everything recently painted, so the painted painted over all that stuff, knowing it was rotting. 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Mark - 16 points of touch makes for problems!  And you can see that each column carries quite a load.  It's an old house!

Mike - the engineer seemed to think it was an easier fix than I was thinking.  Which is why I don't make recommendations!

Gary - this problem has been coming along nicely for years!  It's time to fix it properly and for good.

Thanks Tom.  Transference of load is one of the most important things to look for on a pre-drywall inspection.  And here the load was certainly transferred, right into the wood!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Myrl - that home, and porch, is a gorgeous setting.  It really is a beautiful home.

Good idea Ed!  This was a lot of load at each point.  Hence the problems!

That's it exactly Scott.  I don't step out of character unless I am doing it for fun.

Thanks Richie.  This was an interesting and fun inspection.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Wow Than.  That is one of the most important things to look for in a pre-drywall inspection.  I have seen bearing walls 18" off a beam!

Bill - houses this size are a real hobby and a continual project.  But they sure are beautiful!

Thanks Cheryl.  There were a lot of finds on this house, and hopefully they can all be taken care of.

Sally and David - they are a pretty and essential element of the porch.  It really is gorgeous.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Joetta - I am there to evaluate.  But often I get caught up with beauty or serious problems!

Thanks Adrian.  There were a lot of good people involved with this house.

Eileen - they are there because over 100 years ago an engineer/architect determined that they needed to be there!  They are doing well overall.

Dave - that's left over from my post yesterday about this house, called Julius Squeezer.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Thanks Doris, which is why they do what they do and I do what I do!

Thanks Steven.  Coulda, shoulda, woulda...

Karen - I hope the final cost isn't much.  I haven't heard what it is.

Chris - I run into columns a lot, but never before have I seen them on aluminum feet like these!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Thanks Joe.  I hear it is a beautiful town.  I am pulling for the basketball team too!

Evelyn - this was a fun house to be in and look at.  There was a lot to see!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Jay, another interesting post about this Victorian house. What a lovely place. I hope the pests doesn't include the critter in the basement :)

Sharon

Posted by Sharon Alters, Realtor - Homes for Sale Fleming Island FL (Coldwell Banker Vanguard Realty - 904-673-2308) over 5 years ago

This post is very informative.. I learn something new with each of your posts. Thanks for sharing your insights and your expertise

 

Posted by Joan Whitebook, Consumer Focused Real Estate Services (BHG The Masiello Group) over 5 years ago
Jay, you write such interesting things and give us good information for things to look out for. Thanks again.
Posted by Debbie Reynolds, Your Dedicated Clarksville TN Real Estate Agent (Platinum Properties) over 5 years ago

I think I was the biggest pest found in this house Sharon.  Just sayin'...

Joan - glad you do!  That's the point of all this!  Thank you!

Debbie - this is something I have never seen before.  Those aluminum feet are supposed to be used under deck posts and on top of concrete!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Thanks Jay, always learning something new to look for while shopping for new investments.  So far I have not encountered this problem, but I am glad that you pointed it out for the future.

Posted by Bob Crane, Forestland Experts! 715-204-9671 (Woodland Management Service / Woodland Real Estate, Keller Williams fox cities) over 5 years ago

I had never encountered it before either Bob, but we are always on the look out!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Seems like the intention was good, but the thinking was bad. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 5 years ago

I agree Jim.  But no need to bring national politics into it!    ;>)

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

I wonder if the situation would have been improved at all if the aluminum feet were round instead of square with pointed corners?

Posted by Brian Schulman, Lancaster County PA RealEstate Expert 717-951-5552 (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Lancaster PA) over 5 years ago

This is a constant problem here in Florida and we have too many experts with varying opinions, makes for interesting transactions sometimes.

Posted by Bill Fields (Bill Fields Learning Systems) over 5 years ago

Good morning Jay. Looks like a problem waiting to happen. I noticed the handrials missing right off as I am in a fight with an appraiser demanding handrails on a 15" high deck. Code is 32" but he will not give. lol

Posted by Randy Ostrander, Real Estate Broker, Serving Big Rapids and West Central MI (Lake and Lodge Realty LLC ) over 5 years ago

Great post and thanks for the pictures..

 

 

 

 

Posted by George P. Cruz Sr., PSL FL CDPE, TRC, CIPS (DR Horton) over 5 years ago
I've learned a lot, hanging around you inspectors. My trusted inspector explains things to the buyers and we all learn from him. Thanks for the post. That porch looked so good that indidn't look past the good looks, like a normal buyer would, and didn't see any problem. .
Posted by Kathy McAlpin (HomeSmart - Arrowhead) over 5 years ago

Jay , we see lots of structural problems where interior point loads are unsupported to the structure below . The 2 most common are posts with point loads falling between floor joists & not solid blocked to below so the subfloor sheathing bows . Also at exterior walls where multiple studs hold up a large beam and it is not blocked on top of the foundation wall at the sill plate/ box joist areas , which will also bow the subfloor .

Yesterday we jacked up a large bay window , removed the brackets & siding , cut out the wall sheathing , installed solid blocking behind the sheathing , reinstalled the sheathing , siding & 2 new brackets and now the window works like designed . The weight of the bay was pushing the brackets into the sheathing between 2 studs & causing it to sag , especially without cable support from above .

Keepin' it Green !

Posted by Edward D. Nikles (Ed Nikles Custom Builder , Inc. / Nikles Realty , Inc.) over 5 years ago

Wow...this is a prime example of "a picture says a thousand words"!

Thanks for the post!

Posted by Gretchen Bradley (Realty Source Inc.) over 5 years ago

I love those front porches. Have to do them correctly or you have these problems. Hey, they look better without the stupid railings BTW.

Posted by Lyn Sims, Schaumburg IL Area Real Estate (RE/MAX Suburban) over 5 years ago

Beautiful home.  I hope the new owners can get the problem corrected, and enjoy the home for another 100 + years

Posted by Karen Steed, Associate Broker Haralson Realty (Tallapoosa, Bremen, Waco, Buchanan, Temple, Carrollton) over 5 years ago

It sounds like you had quite an adventure on this one with Lenn. I would have guessed that the cost to repair would have been expensive. That's why it's better not to assume and get the right professional in to price the job before walking away.

Posted by Tammie White, Broker, Franklin TN Homes for Sale (Franklin Homes Realty LLC) over 5 years ago

Good work.  I would not have caught the issue.  That is why we hire home inspectors.

Posted by Gene Riemenschneider, Turning Houses into Homes (Home Point Real Estate) over 5 years ago

Jay,

 Great pictures. Interesting how sometimes engineers see somthing as no big deal when it makes me a bit uncomfortable.

Posted by Donald Hester, NCW Home Inspections, LLC (NCW Home Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Interesting post. Thank you.  I can see the intention of the blocks, but obviously they were used in the wrong application. I'm sure as an inspector you see it all! Seems more than a few of the blogs here would also be helpful to people in the building trades, hadn't thought about recommending AR to some of my contractor friends before!

Posted by Kim Mulligan, Selling Homes for the 21st Century (Cooper Jacobs Real Estate) over 5 years ago

I agree with Lyn - those beautiful old portches DO look better without a railing. But --- that house was built in the days of personal responsibility. (Don't go falling off, dummy!)

Posted by Marte Cliff, your real estate writer (Marte Cliff Copywriting) over 5 years ago

Brian - I think a round, pressure-treated piece of wood under each one would have solved the problem.  No happy feet!

Bill - everyone is putting a little salt into the soup, and eventually it is inedible!

Randy - I wouldn't know how to handle that one!  Rails are nice, but on this house would be quite the distraction, unless done really, really well.

You're welcome George.  Thanks for stopping by!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Kathy - apparently nobody noticed until the pesky me showed up!

Ed - on pre-drywall inspections, I have seen load-bearing walls 18" off the beam intended to support them!  And I used to give energy advice for free.  Now people pay me to do "audits!"  That's GREEN!

Gretchen - they sure do in this case!  So, this post says 6000 words?

Lyn - I agree.  If I lived there I would try to get by without rails!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Karen - I spoke with Lenn today and they will be able to take care of it!

I thought it might be Tammie, but it turns out to be cheaper than they expected.

Gene - apparently I am the first to notice it!

Don - his solution was simple,  Cut out everything under the post and put in a block.  Then rebuild the decking around the block.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Kim - there are a couple of contractors who post here.  Check them out!

I think so too Marte.  Then one of the grandkids takes a big header...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Posted by Marshall Brown, BSEE, CHI (Mid America Inspection Services, LLC) over 5 years ago

Marshall - so is the path to front porch wood rot!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Jay, Very interesting post. I'm learning a lot about what to look for in a listing.

Posted by Wayne Jackson, North Idaho Realtor, Serving Coeur dnullAlene and Hayden Lake (Lakeshore Realty 208-714-4109) over 5 years ago

Glad you enjoyed it Wayne.  There are a thousand things to look for in a listing!  Start writing!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

All you do is observe and report?  Are you saying that tongue in cheek?  You're kidding, right?

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Minneapolis Home Inspections (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 5 years ago

Actually we talk a lot Reubs, because there are always questions and I have thoughts, but that sort of thing does not make it into my reports! I do observe and report and I am an observant boy!

Then I might take a moment later to blog about it...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 5 years ago

Nice looking home. The column is so obvious. How could a home owner not know?

Posted by Wayne B. Pruner, Tigard Oregon Homes for Sale, Realtor, GRI (Oregon First) about 5 years ago

I think they did Wayne.  An engineer told them what needed doing and I understand the repairs were made. 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 5 years ago

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