What I'm Seeing Now

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Technically Speaking

Listing agents can be funny.  Some like to show up at the end of a home inspection on their listing "just to answer any questions."  Sometimes they also feel the need to give me a little history, just so I know.

I have been doing this long enough to be able to translate all that.  What the agent is really saying is, "I know there's going to be a list and I want a head's up now before the report actually comes out."  And, "This homeowner lived here a long time and did a lot of work himself.  He is very home savvy."

On this particular inspection, the house was in overall good condition.  But there was a long list of things that simply needed to be corrected, technically speaking. 

Take this dryer outlet for example.

1.  It's junction is inside an electrical box and that box is secured to the wall.  This is all correct, technically speaking.  But it's secured onto a small wood strip glued to a concrete block wall.  I assumed (you don't want to assume really) that the box was screwed to that wood strip, but I really don't know.  This is all incorrect, technically speaking.

And it's been fine until now.

2.  The service cable goes inside the box where a junction has been made.  This is all correct, technically speaking.  But the box is very small for such a large cable and because of that the cable had to be pulled out of the box in order for everything to fit inside.  This is all incorrect, technically speaking.

And it's been fine until now.

3.  Further, that cable was improperly stripped, leaving the hot and neutral cables exposed to potential damage.  This is not a small amperage line and can really hurt somebody!  That gray insulation with the writing on it should go completely inside the box, technically speaking.

And it's been fine until now.

4.  The service cables are so large that where they go into the box they are very tight and cannot be easily pulled out.  This is all correct, technically speaking.  But the National Electric Code stipulates that any electrical cable going into any electrical box should be secured with a connector clamp.  This clamp does two things - it holds the cable tightly in place and prevents any sparks from escaping through that hole.  Because this box is too small, the hole accommodating the cables is very small and a connector clamp will not fit.  Therefore one is not present.  This is all incorrect, technically speaking.

And it's been fine until now.

5.  The box has a protective metal cover which houses the junction properly and prevents sparks from escaping.  This is all correct, technically speaking.  But really a cover plate is needed.  Do you see the ground lines on the right side of the outlet holes?  A cover plate would protect that also.  That is another reason why this box should be installed beside a 2x4 stud, securely fastened, and flush to the edge, so a cover plate rests flat and secure.  There is no properly-placed cover plate.  This is all incorrect, technically speaking.

And it's been fine until now.

Why do I keep saying technically speaking?  Because bubbly Miss Listing Agent kept saying that this dryer receptacle had been there a long time and had been fine until now, so "technically speaking" it is OK!  With every little point I made about THIS ONE THING, the Little Miss kept debating me with her "technically speaking" come back!  She also said, "And it's been fine until now..." more than once.

I WAS JUST ABOUT AS TIRED HEARING ALL THAT AS YOU HAVE BEEN READING IT!  Although you knew I was leading to a point, didn't you!  After that, when she pressed me for the "rest of the list," I politely refused saying it would be in the report.  I WAS DONE!

How about I do my job and you do yours, lady?  Go home.

My recommendation:  This was just one example of one problem that was OK, technically speaking, and OK to do for yourself, technically speaking, but not OK to sell to someone else because, after all, it was incorrect, technically speaking.  And if the house catches fire or my clients are hurt because of something that I let go and did not mention, well, technically speaking, it would make me feel bad and disrupt my life in a big way!

I will admit to seeing things that are very inventive and not correct, technically speaking, but wouldn't bother me if I was to buy the house.  If it's alright for me, and after discussing it with my clients it's alright with them, I let it go.

The Golden Rule, after all, is a very good way to live, and that's NOT technically speaking.

 

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 66 commentsJay Markanich • December 23 2010 04:57AM

Comments

Hi Jay,

Love it!

The pressure, both subtle and overt, to finish an inspection without demonstrating the things that need attention!

Let the buyer get the inspection they paid for! Let THEIR agent consult with them as to what their next steps will be. When that request gets to the agent's seller, THEN deal with it...

Thanks

Phil

Posted by Phil Leng, Phil Leng - Retired (Retired) over 7 years ago

And here I thought that it was do unto others before they had the chance to do unto you...

Posted by TeamCHI - Complete Home Inspections, Inc., Home Inspectons - Nashville, TN area - 615.661.029 (Complete Home Inspections, Inc.) over 7 years ago

Well, Phil, I think that's all correct, technically speaking.  But in practice?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Michael - that's how so many today want to spin it!  I've seen the T-shirt with the guy with a huge screw in his back.

Wonderful talking with you the other day!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Hi Jay, it's chap and dirty, makes you wonder what other electrical issues are concealed in the home.

Posted by Dan Edward Phillips, Realtor and Broker/Owner (Dan Edward Phillips) over 7 years ago

There were a few Dan.  And, like I said, OK for someone to do for themselves, but not to sell to somebody else.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Technically speaking, this is a terrific post.  I'm primarily a buyer's agent, and I've met Miss Bubbly!  All this time I thought I was the only one annoyed!

Posted by Laura Giannotta, Your Realtor Down the Shore! (Keller Williams Realty - Atlantic Shore ) over 7 years ago

She shows up periodically on my inspections, Laura, and can be quite a pest, so you are not alone!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

So many matters here.  The listing agent was clearly over the top and interferring with the home inspection. 

Technically speaking, that house needs an electrical inspection/repair by a licensed electrician.  Anytime there are home owner electrical defects, the buyers/buyer's agent must require an electrican repair these matters FOR SAFETY and also because of the LIABILITY to the agents involved should there be a future electrical failure/accident.

When the home owner performs electrical modifications, even in their own home, SAFETY is always the No. 1 interest.

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Shoot.  I didn't get here soon enough to suggest.  Congrats on a well deserved feature. 

Posted by Debbie Gartner, The Flooring Girl & Blog Stylist -Dynamo Marketers (The Flooring Girl) over 7 years ago

Well I think you'll rank in SEO for "technically speaking". Haha. It's nice to get a perspective of the home inspector once in a while.

Posted by The ATC Properties Team (Keller Williams Realty West Monmouth) over 7 years ago

All correct Lenn!  How many times have you run into Miss Bubbly Listing Agent?  She is still crawling around under my skin layer...

Debbie - didn't know it was featured until now.  Sorry you couldn't push the suggest button!  But, technically speaking, you get credit for it in my book.  How's that?

ATC - I hadn't thought about that!  You think so?  The Goog bots are shooting me to the top with that one?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

We are the listing agents who do appear at the end of an inspection...not because "it 's been fine till now" but just as there are listing agents, selling agents, lenders, appraisers, etc, that are not "fine til now" inspectors also fall in that category...and since David has more background in some areas than the inspectors, it helps both the homeowner AND the buyer.....technically speaking....happiest of holidays !

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Realtors - Luxury - Divorce (Keller Williams 414-525-0563) over 7 years ago

Jay:

I appreciate it when a listing broker makes an appearance at one of my inspections because I want them to see first-hand what the issues are so they can explain them to the seller. However, it is not the job of the listing broker to grill the home inspector. He works for the buyer and it should fall to the buyer's agent to explain to the listing broker which items need to be addressed.

 

Posted by Claudette Millette, Buyer, Broker - Metrowest Mass (The Buyers' Counsel) over 7 years ago

In our area, many listing agents don't attend the inspections for liability reasons.  When I purchase rental property as a buyer, I follow the inspector and take notes on what he points out! 

Posted by Wallace S. Gibson, CPM, LandlordWhisperer (Gibson Management Group, Ltd.) over 7 years ago

Great Post! I like when the listing agent shows up at the end, if they interupt the inspector, I let them know we can walk through the house after he/she is done and go over the list. But, ultimately it is up to the buyer to decide what they want to ask fo to be fixed. 

Posted by Jen Anderson (Exit By the Bay Realty) over 7 years ago

I think you nailed it with "you do your job and let me do mine". If the potential buyer is paying you I would think they would be the only one present at time of inspection. If the list agent wants to be there, great, but let the inspector do their job.

Posted by Randy Ostrander, Real Estate Broker, Serving Big Rapids and West Central MI (Lake and Lodge Realty LLC ) over 7 years ago

Jay,

What an attempt to put words in your mouth!  I talk to inspectors to understand, not to trap or influence them.

 

Posted by Mike Jaquish, 919-880-2769 Cary, NC, Real Estate (Realty Arts) over 7 years ago

I love having the listing agent show up at my inspections. I give me the opportunity to show them first hand why their home savvy homeowner did something that wasn’t right. “Technically speaking” of course. I do however dread when Miss Bubbly shows up. 

Posted by Suesan Jenifer Therriault, "Inspecting every purchase as if it were my own". (JTHIS-Professional Home Inspection Team) over 7 years ago

Jay, this in another great post from you!  I always enjoy your posts - the information and the bit of humor thrown in for good measure.  Enjoy this great season!

Posted by Barbara Hensley, Homes for Sale in Rockwall County, Texas (RE/MAX Properties) over 7 years ago
Jay, love your posts & yes, i am a listing agent too but would never interfere like that with an inspection...that's out & out wrong...wait for the report, present it to the sellers & if you disagree get another professional to evaluate it...good for you...best
Posted by Ginny Gorman, Homes for Sale in North Kingstown RI and beyond (RI Real Estate Services ~ 401-529-7849~ RI Waterfront Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Jay, great post and a very good point. Technically speaking, the agent should let you do your job and wait for the report.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA over 7 years ago

Jay, this is another fine example of why buying a home from a do-it-yourselfer needs to be inspected by a pro such as yourself. I am willing to bet you find a lot more of this stuff in FSBO homes then those listed by a Realtor (proportionately, technically speaking) Have a Merry Christmas Jay.

Posted by Bob "RealMan" Timm, Bob Timm, Broker Associate, Alliance Real Estate (Alliance Real Estate - Minot) over 7 years ago

Jay,

Whether I'm the listing agent or the buyer agent, I simply keep my mouth shut during home inspections. Haven't had a list agent speak technically but I'm sure that will happen someday too.

Posted by Irene Kennedy Realtor® in Northwestern NJ (Weichert) over 7 years ago

I always go to the the home inspections, it's important to be there I think. This way I know what went on, what was said and relay what went on with my buyers.It would seen to me that every agent should be at an inspection.

Patricia/Seacoast NH & ME

Posted by Patricia Aulson, Realtor - Portsmouth NH Homes-Hampton NH Homes (BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOME SERVICES Verani Realty NH Real Estate ) over 7 years ago

Jay - this is why anyone who purchases and doesn't have a home inspection needs a mental evaluation! There are too many things that the average homeowner just can't know! Now if YOU are a home inspector purchasing, that is another story. I have seen buyers that don't get an inspection and later complain about things that 'pop up'.

Posted by Barbara-Jo Roberts Berberi, MA, PSA, TRC - Greater Clearwater Florida Residential Real Estate Professional, Palm Harbor, Dunedin, Clearwater, Safety Harbor (Charles Rutenberg Realty) over 7 years ago

Jay, I have nothing but respect for your profession. I always am present for inspections so I can give my sellers a heads-up. I don't argue with the inspector. And I never use the words "technically speaking". I like to take this time to learn what things we may need to do to be proactive in reference to repairs. It makes both me and my sellers look good if we decide to make repairs even if the buyer hasn't requested them.

Posted by Tammie White, Broker, Franklin TN Homes for Sale (Franklin Homes Realty LLC) over 7 years ago

Oh the pop in -- good technique.  At least they are trying to do their job I suppose.  What are they going to tell the home inspector though?  Although experts disagree it is poor form to engage in professional banter when you are not a member of that profession.  Get a real second opinion later but shut your trap for now.

Posted by Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D., Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879 (Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795) over 7 years ago

Nice post, I always get a chuckle out of the history or justification of unsafe practices by sellers. I have the buyers safty and best intrest in mind and I am a 3rd party there to give an unbias report on the condition  of the property.

Posted by Brian Persons, Certified Master Inspector (Brian Persons Front Range Home Inspections) over 7 years ago

That dryer plug was installed by a butcher! I like when owners say they don't know where their septic cleanout is and follow up with "We've been here 15 years and never had a problem with it." Now the odds are really stacked against them for a septic problem.

Posted by Robert Slick, NRBA, RDCPro, Trident/CCAR MLS (Beach and River Homes) over 7 years ago

I hate when the listing agent tries to influence the inspection.  The picture above looks like a hack job!

Posted by Justin Dibbs, REALTOR® - Ashburn Virginia Homes for Sale (Pearson Smith Realty) over 7 years ago

Interesting post. I go to all home inspections whether I am a buyers agent or listing agent. I listen but keep quiet, which isn't always easy. It's always fun when the inspector walks into a room and announces in a loud voice"whoo now there's an issue!!" In the many years of selling real estate I have had way to many "home inspectors" tell people they need the whole house rewired when something like this was the only electrical problem they found. I always tell the buyer and the seller to get a qualified professional to give them an estimate on repairs before they jump to conclusions because of the  the inspection report.

Posted by Darryl Salls (Darryl Salls, Century 21 Energy Shield Realty) over 7 years ago

I mainly list, I don't show up ever. I know I will get a report of things that need attention before removing the Contractors Inpsection COntingency.

 

Posted by Missy Caulk, Savvy Realtor - Ann Arbor Real Estate (Missy Caulk TEAM) over 7 years ago

Thank God I haven't met Ms. Bubbly yet! Don't want to meet Ms Bubbly.

Thanks for the great post and for giving us some insight into the inspection side of it........I'll continue to let you do your job and i'll do mine! :o)

Happy Holidays!

Posted by Evelyn Rice, SFR - Northern Nevada (RE/MAX Complete Realty) over 7 years ago

Jay, I have a friend who is an electrical inspector for the state. He tells me his main focus is safety. He will not split hairs when someone is "close" to what the code intended but if it is unsafe it fails for sure!

Posted by Mike Frazier, Northwest Tennessee Realtor (Carousel Realty of Dyer County) over 7 years ago

Jay,

Good insights. It is difficult to deal with electrical issues without the assistance of a trained inspector.

Brian

Posted by Brian Madigan, LL.B., Broker (RE/MAX West Realty Inc., Brokerage (Toronto)) over 7 years ago

Great post.  Techincally Speaking - Happy Holidays.

Posted by Terri Stephens, REALTOR, Calgary & Airdrie 403-827-4663 (CIR REALTY ) over 7 years ago

Jay,

You've painted listings agents with a broad brush.

As a major listing broker, I've never shown up at an inspection. Sellers are always asking if the inspector  found anything. Many want me to call the selling agent. I've yet to do so.

The ball is in the selling agent's court. If they decide not to ask for repairs, great! If they do ask for repairs, we'll deal with it once they do.

Tom

Posted by Tom Branch, Broker, CDPE, SFR, ACRE, Plano TX Ambassador (RE/MAX Dallas Suburbs) over 7 years ago

I've met Miss Bubbly and I know she thinks she's doing a service to her client, but this kind of interference is unprofessional. As a listing agent, there's nothing that I can add to the home inspection process. Even as a Buyer's Agent, other than the warm fuzzy of hand-holding, there is nothing that I can add, since home inspections are not my area of expertise. Sorry you had to deal with this but at least it made good reading for the rest of us! Congrats on your feature.

Posted by Rebecca Diamond, Main Line Homes for Sale (Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Bryn Mawr) over 7 years ago

I wonder if it was super glue that was used to attach it to the wall.  Technically speaking, it is good stuff, right?

Posted by Chris Alston, Silicon Valley, California (Chris Alston (Keller Williams Realty, Silicon Valley, California)) over 7 years ago

I just closed (how it closed, I will never know!) on a deal where the seller had done all the work on the house over the years, and tried to do the repairs found in our inspection (even though the repair addendum said the work was to be performed by a contractor).  What a mess.

Posted by Catherine Ulrey, Equestrian and Acreage Property Specialist (Keller Williams Capital City) over 7 years ago

As a listing agent I WILL NEVER attend an inspection! I do not want to know everything that the inspector discovered. If the deal falls apart and I have knowledge of a defect from the inspection I will now have to disclose it to any other potential buyers and it could negatively impact my seller.

I also do not want copies of the inspection report. Just send me your request for what you would like to have corrected and I will present that to the seller.

Posted by Randy Randolph, Uber Broker , Redmond, Kirkland, Renton, Short Sales (RSVP Real Estate) over 7 years ago

I loath the Miss Bubbly types. They don't like us to play real estate agent, the shouldn't play home inspector.

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 7 years ago
Good feature. Many times the sellers INSIST that the items red flagged on the inspection are "no problem at all" because that's the way they lived with it.
Posted by Erica Ramus, MRE, Schuylkill County PA Real Estate (Erica Ramus - Ramus Realty Group - Pottsville, PA ) over 7 years ago

Went to a home inspection once with my buyer (I always go with  my buyers) and the listing agent AND the seller were both there.  It was awful!  The LA & seller followed the inspector around with the seller telling the inspector how her son, the electrician had done this and done that and there was nothing wrong with it because her son knew what he was doing and she was not going to fix it because there was nothing wrong.  It was the worst inspection ever!  When I have the listing I never go to the inspection and I tell my sellers they need to leave.  

Posted by Maureen Harmon, YOUR North Florida Relocation Specialists (Exit Real Estate Gallery) over 7 years ago

How about I do my job and you do yours, lady?  Go home.

Ha!  Well put!  This was an excellent post and a joy to read.  Thanks.

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 7 years ago

Enjoyed the information and humor in your post on the Ms Bubbly.  Unfortunately there are more than one Ms. Bubbly in the business.  Technically speaking what you have described sure would need the blessing of a licensed electrician willing to say so on paper.

Sue of Robin and Sue

Posted by Robin Dampier REALTOR®, Hendersonville & Western NC Real Estate Source (Coldwell Banker King) over 7 years ago

S&D - wow, I especially love it when the agent knows more than I!  But, all said, that is pretty much all the time!

Claudette - my opinion, this is the only chance the buyer will have unfettered access to the property prior to closing, and it should be so.  There has not been time to digest the inspection and the report has not been generated.  Until then, there is nothing to talk about.  No one knows what the buyer will be asking for.

Wallace - then there must be a whole lot of liability going on here!

Jen - exactly and the buyer hasn't had time to digest everything yet!  What will they be asking for?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Randy - there is always that temptation to take over from the inspector!  My experience anyway.  Sometimes I really think - Go home!

Mike - they would have to try a long, long time to put words into my mouth or influence me.  That will be a frustrating failure for sure.

Thank you Barbara.  Sometimes the humor is what gets me by!

Elfin Ginny - once a listing agent actually called another inspector to ask questions about something I noted on the report, in front of everyone!  He agreed with her that what I had mentioned was wrong.  Then told me in front of everyone.  I asked if he was still on the phone and he was, so loud enough for him to hear I said, "Anyone who thinks he can diagnose that over the phone is an idiot.  Give me his name and association affiliation."  He hung up immediately.  HA!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Michael - there's not much to be said if the buyer doesn't ask for something to be done.

Of course Bob, because the seller doesn't know what to do really without an agent.  Same to you and yours!

Irene - make your decisions once you see what is on the table, not before!

Patricia - I think the buyer is the process and what the buyer wants in an addendum is the end game.  Nothing is decided yet at the inspection!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Barbara-Jo - I have thought about that and I believe I would have another inspector help me in my own home purchase.

Tammie - that is an interesting position and not one have have seen before!  Good for you!

Well, Tni, would that that was the norm!  I wish!

Brian - how often have we heard the, "But I've always done it that way!" comment?  So what, you've always done it wrong!  History questions of a repair are relevant as to time frame and such, but for now it is the buyer's time to spend with his new house!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Robert - that is one response I hear a lot and really, really don't like to!

Justin - one hack job of many in that house!  Overall it was in good shape though.

Darryl - not only do I never do that (!) but even if the house really did need to be completely rewired, I would never say that.  I might mention all the advantages to having a licensed electrician out and why I think so...

Missy - and THAT'S about the time things need to be considered and taken care of!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Evelyn - unfortunately, sometimes it isn't Miss B who shows up, it's Miss Argue-Meanly.  The hyphen is very chic, you know.

Mike - a good philosophy to live by.  He doesn't have the liability that I do though.

Brian - well, and more so with the introduction of Miss Bubbly!

Terri - thank you and Merry Christmas to you too.  What's the hat for?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

That's it exactly Tom.  But I really think the only agent I painted here was Miss Bubbly!

Thanks Rebecca.  Miss Bubbly does seem to get around!

It is Chris, but no where near as attractive as duct tape.  I don't know what they were thinking.

Catherine - some people seem to have those ears blocked and just a little pride gets in the way!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Randy - here the requirement is that the listing agent and buyer receive a copy of the inspection report, and maybe so there is proper disclosure of defects.  Just because you don't know doesn't mean a danger doesn't exist!

Jim - I seem to meet agents all the time who think they are better inspectors than I.  Remember Miss There's-No-Such-Thing-As-Mold-In-An-Attic?  I still have never heard from her!  Still not sure why...

Erica - going into people's homes as you and I do we know that people live with a lot of things!

Maureen - when that happens I politely tell everyone that this is the buyer's unfettered time and they are invited to go somewhere else.  If not it is best to reschedule the inspection.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

And I'm glad you enjoyed it Reubs!  But really, how many times has this happened to you!

Robin and Sue - which is, AFTER ALL, the point of an addendum!  The photo above is really an easy fix.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

In the listing agents eyes nothing is ever a problem...it is always "grandfathered it", "the way seller bought it","this house is not new, what does the buyer expect?", "seller is a contractor so there can't be anything wrong", "this is a grey area" and my very favorite:

"Why does the buyer need the windows to open?"

Loved your post, thank you.

Eve in Orlando

Posted by Mike & Eve Alexander, Exclusively Representing ONLY Orlando Home Buyers (Buyers Broker of Florida ) over 7 years ago

You are very right about all of that Eve!  And I have heard every one of them!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Of course it's been fine up until now, but what about tomorrow or better yet the day after closing?

It's your job to inform the buyers and let them make the decision.

Posted by Christine Donovan, Broker/Attorney 714-319-9751 DRE01267479 - Costa M (Donovan Blatt Realty) over 7 years ago

I agree Christine.  Observe and report.  Beyond that it is the buyer's course of action.  The buyer is the process.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

"If the deal falls apart and I have knowledge of a defect from the inspection I will now have to disclose it to any other potential buyer"

Sure seems like an ostrich's head in the sand approach to full disclosure.  

While it's likely more common than most of us would care for, I'm not sure "negatively impact my seller" is a good reason to stick your head in the sand about potential dangers to the home buyer. 

Just seems like a good way to get bit in the butt!

Posted by Erby Crofutt, The Central Kentucky Home Inspector, Lexington KY (B4 U Close Home Inspections&Radon Testing (www.b4uclose.com)) over 7 years ago

I agree with you completely Erby, and was a little surprised by that comment!  I tried to be polite in my response.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay:  Technically speaking.  YIKES!!!  Was there going to be a debate over every item?  Technically speaking, I hope the door didn't hit her on the way out.

Posted by Valerie Zinger, Home Organizer (House Proud Ottawa-Ontario-Canada) over 7 years ago

Had I not stopped it Valerie, there would have been a debate on every splinter in the house.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Hi Jay, I guess you have heard it all in your job. I had a gas fitting company for 10 years and advised my employees to never comment on another trade. I have to agree with you that i usually leads to things that you don't want to get in to. Just do the job that you were hired to do and take instructions from the person that's paying you to be there.

Posted by Michelle Finnamore, Preparing your property for sale (Toronto GTA, Alliston, Newmarket) over 7 years ago

Michelle - my job is to observe and report.  Sometimes that involves commenting on how something was done, but I never say that another trade was less than stellar!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

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