What I'm Seeing Now

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Does Brick Really Need To Weep?

In the olden days the brick siding you saw on houses was structural.  There were two layers of brick, into what was tied structural members.  The brick was structural, the wood was interior. 

Currently the brick siding you see is a facade, sometimes called a "veneer," and the wood interior is the structural part of the house.

Various construction materials combine to create this newer method, but essentially the brick is set off of the wood interior and exterior sheathing, which is all protected by some form of vapor retardation.

The brick is virtually strapped to the house.

As such, moisture develops between the brick and sheathing.  It needs somewhere to go. 

Weep holes are an important part of the construction method to allow air in and moisture out.  An excess of moisture in there can lead to its migration into the interior and when that happens the ultimate result can be molds.

 

This is one form of weep hole.  A section of mortar between the bricks has been intentionally left out.  Other weep holes can include a multiplicity of simple holes, or wicks, plastic inserts, and so on.

Either way, when you look at a brick-sided house, weep holes are an important thing to look for.

Often I don't see them!

Why?  Because they have been diligently eliminated by a home owner who does not understand why that silly brick layer left holes all over his house!  By golly, he wanted to fix that "oversight..." and got right on it!

Homeowner "fixes" I have seen include caulking, mortar, rags, spray polyfoam (which is ALWAYS very attractive) and wax!

The "fixes" look something like this!

This particular house was built in 1972, just after the "new" brick facade siding came into vogue.  As such it had weep holes all around.

And these weep holes were filled all around by some house-savvy homeowner!  This guy chose mortar.

Some of it was cracking and loose so I could tell it had been there a while.

Don't do this!

Everything wants to breath, and eliminate moisture, even the walls of your house!

My recommendation:  When you approach a brick-veneered house, have a look around for weep holes.  The house will be happy you did.

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 105 commentsJay Markanich • November 17 2010 06:44AM

Comments

Jay, thank you for this post! We don't have many brick homes here, but I actually have had someone mention the holes. Now I know!

The amount of info I learn from all you wonderful home inspectors here is invaluable. Thank you!

Let it weep....

Posted by Andrea Swiedler, Realtor, Southern Litchfield County CT (Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices New England Properties) over 9 years ago

A good cry is very therapeutic....who would have thought...it applied to a house...not enough homeowner apparently !

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Real Estate Agents - Luxury - Divorce (EXP Realty 414-525-0563) over 9 years ago

Interesting-thanks for the information! I will now be on the look out!

Posted by Jennifer Arbach, Office Administrator (EXIT Realty Front and Center) over 9 years ago

Andrea - when I see the holes clogged up I can almost hear the house weeping...   :(

S&D - I can tell you that this house had no opportunity for such therapy, until maybe now.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Jennifer - keep your eyes peeled, unlike peeling and chopping onions which can really make you weep.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Amazing that the homeowner's first response was to fill it in - and not even to match with cement. Appreciate the post on weep holes - great to get the information out to homeowners and buyers

Posted by K.C. McLaughlin, Realtor, e-PRO, Homes for Sale - Cary, Raleigh NC (RE/MAX United) over 9 years ago

K.C. - they fill it with whatever comes to mind!  It seems to me that with so many holes, equally spaced, it might be that they are there for a reason.  One should find out!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Very good advice for home owners. Thanks for sharing.

 Blooming for you.

Posted by Roy Kelley (Realty Group Referrals) over 9 years ago

I did know about weepholes and was surprised that home-owners fill them in.  With wax.....really????  I am going to keep an eye out.  Way too funny.

Posted by Kathryn Maguire, Serving Chesapeake, Norfolk, VA Beach (GreatNorfolkHomes.com (757) 560-0881) over 9 years ago

Thank Roy.  And if you are still getting your camillias to bloom, you are a better man than I!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Makes me weep to know I have never noticed this. Thanks Jay, seems I always learn from your posts.

Posted by Randy Ostrander, Real Estate Broker, Serving Big Rapids and West Central MI (Lake and Lodge Realty LLC ) over 9 years ago

I have seen all sorts of fillers Kathryn.  To date no oatmeal though.  I bet fruitcake would work pretty well.

Randy - and I am glad you do!  One of the many services we inspectors on AR offer!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Good morning Jay. And the "fix" for builders in this area is to drill a 3/8" hole between the mortar joints. This "fix" has been approved by all the local codes departments. Kinda defeats the purpose, but who am I to argue with such superior intellect...

Posted by TeamCHI - Complete Home Inspections, Inc., Home Inspectons - Nashville, TN area - 615.661.029 (Complete Home Inspections, Inc.) over 9 years ago

A weepy house is a happy house.  Grew up in a solid brick house that looked as good on the outside after 45 years as it did the day it was built.  Ahhhh solid construction what a concept.

Posted by Cindy Jones, Pentagon, Fort Belvoir & Quantico Real Estate News (Integrity Real Estate Group) over 9 years ago

HA!  I had a contract of a home in Severna Park some time ago and the home inspection revealed that the brick front was separating from the home from top to bottom by as much as 3-4 full inches at the top. 

Yep, the "straps" were defective and insufficient. 

It was covered by the structural warranty on a 3 year old home. 

All fixed and happy buyer thanks to an alert home inspector.

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 9 years ago

Michael - on the most recent new construction I see many, many such holes!  They are everywhere - above and below each window, around the doors, every 12" along the bottom of each facade wall - everywhere!

I have yet to read how well they are working - too new I guess.

Cindy - no longer done!  Except at the bank, if you look carefully.  Gee, is there a reason for that?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

I have seen that Lenn.  It is pretty obvious, especially from the side.

You go to Severna Park!?  In college I had a roommate from there.  Kinda far from home, huh?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Good information Jay.  I never really thought about it.

Aaron

Posted by Aaron Silverman, Improving Real Estate Experience through Education (SuccessfulRental.com, Bluewater Property Management, LLC and Lowcountry Turnkey Properties, LLC) over 9 years ago

Jay,

Great explantion. I rebloged it.

Tom

Posted by Tom Branch, Broker, CDPE, SFR, ACRE, Plano TX Ambassador (RE/MAX Dallas Suburbs) over 9 years ago

Jay,

I have explained weep holes in my own way many times.  You have done a nice job, and I will probably bookmark it to send to clients in the future.

Reblogged.

Posted by Mike Jaquish, 919-880-2769 Cary, NC, Real Estate (Realty Arts) over 9 years ago

Aaron - when I walk up to a house, I am thinking a thousand things that probably never occur to people!

Thanks Tom, for the reblog and for stopping by!

And thank you too, Mike.  So, it's a keeper?  Great!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

HA!  My home was not always where is is.  When I sold that house, I lived in Laurel, MD.

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 9 years ago

Very good point!  Year s ago when I 1st saw this on a new construction; I stupidly asked the building manager - he explained it to me.. the buyer was actually glad I asked because she was too afraid to ask and was thinking they forgot something!

Posted by James Downing - Metro DC Houses Team REALTORS®, CRS, GRI, ABR,MRP, MilRes, When Looking to Buy or Sell - Make the Right Move (Real Living | At Home) over 9 years ago

Many of us are familiar with the concept of weep holes, but don't know exactly what to look for.  Thanks for the graphics of both proper and improper cases!

Posted by Brian Schulman, Lancaster County PA RealEstate Expert 717-951-5552 (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Lancaster PA) over 9 years ago

See it all the time Aaron.  Somehow homeowners always seem more concerned about looks than function.  But I guess they have a choice.  Weep or remove mold.  Let them breathe and let them weep.  Of course where I really get curious is all of the stone veneer.  What kind of catastrophe are we setting ourselves up for in the future with this heavy trend toward stone?

Posted by Dwight Carson (Re/Max United Realty) over 9 years ago

Oh my gosh, I am returning a call to a client today that has broached this subject. Thanks for the post!

Posted by Cheryl Ritchie, Southern Maryland 301-980-7566 (RE/MAX Leading Edge www.GoldenResults.com) over 9 years ago

Jay,

Thanks for the wonderful post and explaining about weep holes.  We have quite a few brick homes and many people don't know about weep holes.  Have a wonderful day.

Posted by Carla Freund, Carolina Life RealEstate & Relocation 919-602-8489 (Keller Williams Preferred Realty) over 9 years ago

Thanks Jay what a great learning post for me and my clients.  I'm going to share it with them. Margaret C.

Posted by Margaret C. Taylor, St Marys/Calvert/Charles MD Real Estate Agent (Century 21 New Millennium MD) over 9 years ago

Interesting. My first home was brick and although I watched the construction process I never noticed the weep holes. Good information, thanks.

Posted by Gary L. Waters Broker Associate, Bucci Realty, Fifteen Years Experience in Brevard County (Bucci Realty, Inc.) over 9 years ago

I thought that might be the case Lenn!  I was a' tweakin' you...  I had another roommate from Ellicott City!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Jay, the little subtleties that go into construction. We don't see a lot of brick in our area because of the cost of construction. Back in the late 70's with my very first home, I had brick veneer on the 3 sides that face the sun and the back that faced the woods I had a brick wrap at the corners and sided the rest. Brick is amazing for it's heat retention and also for keeping a home cool. That air barrier has a lot of functionality, as an air gap in addition to allowing drainage. Great post.

Posted by Ed Silva, Central CT Real Estate Broker Serving all equally (RE/MAX Professionals, CT 203-206-0754 ) over 9 years ago

Jim - the only stupid question is the one you don't ask!  So ask! I had a beagle once named Pip who looked much like yours.  And I have a hound/beagle now who does too!  Gee, they must be of the same species or something...

You are welcome Brian.  That's the idea!

Dwight - the new "stone" facades are the new EIFS.  They really will be problematic.

Cheryl - send them the link!

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Carla - well, now you can explain it to them and look real smart!  Because anytime you get new information you can use you are smarter!

Valerie - I know the feeling!  I see'em too!

You are welcome Margaret.  That is what we are all in this together to do!

 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Jay, we still have people and builders here in our area who argue over the necessity of weep holes.  At one house I sold the seller had to have them drilled all the way around the house because they hadn't been installed originally.

Can you do a series on brick faces that fall off and how to fix that problem?

Thanks!

Posted by Bob Haywood, BobHaywood.com (McGraw Realtors) over 9 years ago

Gary - they were probably there in one form or another.

Ed - dead air is actually a pretty good insulator.  That's what the small front section on an igloo is for!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

I have run into those before Bob, but don't have any current photos of my own.  If the facade is not properly strapped it is a problem!  And there is no debate about the necessity of weep holes...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Great tip.  Keep writing articles, I enjoyed it!  Seems like you really know your stuff.

Posted by Yuriy V., Charlotte NC Real Estate, Property Management, Short Sales, Rental (Carolinas Metro Realty & Property Management) over 9 years ago

Thank you Yuriy, for stopping by and your nice compliment!  And I intend to!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Thanks for this post.  Since I deal with older homes I am always looking to learn thing to look for that may be a red flag for unseen problems.

Posted by Rick Fifer, Broker/Owner, Vintage Homes Realty (Vintage Homes Realty) over 9 years ago

Jay, the question comes up all the time.  I like the way you explained it and will keep this info to pass along.

Posted by Joyce Godwin, Realtor, CRS, RE/MAX Elite Properties (RE/MAX Elite Properties; Serving Cypress, Spring, Tomball, NW Houston) over 9 years ago

Jay - Homeowners rarely understand brick veneer; and many believe it to be something it's not--such as waterproof or structural.  Great reminder for homeowners and agents to be aware of bricks' need to do a little "weeping."

Posted by John Mulkey, Housing Guru (TheHousingGuru.com) over 9 years ago

Thanks for the educational tip.  I have seen these weep holes before but did not know what they were.  I have also seen them filled in as demonstrated in the photo, little did I now that I was looking at a red flag.

Posted by Keith Vermilyea (Home Buyers Marketing II, Inc.) over 9 years ago

WOW!!!  I had no idea!!!  GREAT info Jay!  Thanks for sharing :)

Posted by Angelina Clarke (Builder Services Realty, LLC) over 9 years ago

Thanks for the post.  This was new to me about 10 years ago and I had to ask a contractor if they were intended.  I look forward to more posts like this so I'll subscribe.  Thanks.

Posted by Justin Dibbs, REALTOR® - Ashburn Virginia Homes for Sale (Pearson Smith Realty) over 9 years ago

Brick homes are the most popular in Kentucky. Every now and then there are clients that ask me about these weeping holes. Nice post to tell others about this.

Posted by Lizette Fitzpatrick, Lizette Realty, Lexington KY MLS - Kentucky Homes (Lizette Realty - Richmond KY) over 9 years ago

Rick - the more red flags in your pocket the more informed you can make your buyers!

Joyce - glad to help and that you have something to pass along!

John - as you know, many people know so little about houses that what seems common place to you and I really is not common!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Keith - big bummer there, but glad you are up to speed now!

Angelina - that's what we're here for!  It feels good to help you out.

Justin - welcome new subscriber!  Hopefully you will get lots of information you can use?  I will be in Brambleton this afternoon and tomorrow afternoon.  I'll wave!

Lizette - now you won't weep anymore when you don't know the answer.  Because you will!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Gary

Thank youfor the lesson....didn't kow that. Thank you for sharing....

 

Posted by Noemi Cardoso, Providing value to Buyers and Sellers since 2005 (Seven Gables Real Estate - Office in Tustin, Anaheim and Orange) over 9 years ago

Jay, I have always wondered about this and appreciate your clearing this up for me. If a brick house does not have the weep cracks would you recommend that I tell my clients if they are not there? I assume these cracks would be right down near the footer?

Posted by Mike Frazier, Northwest Tennessee Realtor (Carousel Realty of Dyer County) over 9 years ago

I had no idea about brick needing to weep.  Thanks for sharing this valuable information.

Posted by Bob Willis, Orange County & L.A. County Real Estate Agent (Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties) over 9 years ago

Noemi - happy to help!  Information is good in any context.

Mike - yes, they need to be installed.  Today they go not only along the bottom but around windows too.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Bob - it is essential!  Everything needs a way to eliminate moisture.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Jay, I thought it was guitars that weeped----or am I thinking of something else?

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) over 9 years ago

I should re-blog this and title it "Don't Caulk Here, Part III" :)

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 9 years ago

And guitars make people weep when they weep Charlie.  Or am I thinking of something else?

The Beatles?

Reuben - why not!  It is certainly an area that gets caulked a lot!  Just use my pictures, you don't need to mention me.  You are trying to get information out, so do it!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Thanks for the lesson on weeping!!

I've always been a bit of a weep-hole skeptic, although I certainly don't condone covering them up.  Great to know exactly why they are needed.

Where does the moisture come from, by the way??  It's a pretty dry climate here in Austin.

Posted by Dianne Bartlett (Brightside Realty, LLC) over 9 years ago

Jay,

As we have very few brick homes in Pullman, I didn't know about weeping holes.  Thanks for sharing.  It may come in handy someday!

Posted by Lori Churchill Cofer, Realtor - 509-330-0086 - Pullman, WA (Beasley Realty) over 9 years ago

This is one of the reason that I chose to go to scored brick on. It is stucco that when applied, looks like a brick finish. You cannot tell the difference from a distance. Of course up close, a layman would notice your beautiful bricks while a pro would know.....good post and Don't weep for me......

Posted by Richie Alan Naggar, agent & author (people first...then business Ran Right Realty ) over 9 years ago

Had never heard of "weep holes" until very recently when an inspector deemed that my listing did not have sufficient weep holes.  Always something new to learn.  I will definitely bookmark this in the event it should come up again.

Posted by Kathy Kenney, Realtor - Princeton & Central NJ Homes for Sale (Keller Williams, Princeton, NJ) over 9 years ago

Thanks!  This is great information and I will know what to look for now.

Posted by Nancy Timberlake, REALTOR - Southern Maine (RE/MAX Shoreline) over 9 years ago

Good information!  I am guessing this is needed even if it is just the front or part of the front that is brick?  Also what about houses that are actually made of cinderblock ( not just the siding) they would need them too wouldn't they?

Posted by Anna Matsunaga, Seller specialist, Certified Negotiation Expert (Team Momentum Keller Williams Realty Tacoma) over 9 years ago

What about stucco? This was a great post. Thank you.

Posted by Randy Elgin, Sells Affordable Homes for sale in the San Antonio (Keller Williams, San Antonio, Helotes, Leon Valley) over 9 years ago

Jay, I haven't run into any homeowners that have taken the weep hole filling into their own hands!

Posted by Susan Brown (Keller Williams NE, Kingwood Texas (Humble & Atascocita too)) over 9 years ago

Thanks for posting. That is fabulous information to have in my quiver.

Posted by Bill Dandridge, GREEN, ABR, GRI, EcoBroker (MKB, Realtors) over 9 years ago

Dianne - any time you have a difference in temps between inside and out, condensation, and therefore moisture, is the natural result.

Lori - information is information!  Add it to your mental files!

I won't Richie!  Stucco needs to weep too!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Thanks for the informative post Jay. Of course it's thrown up some questions for me about actual brick houses, (where I come from homes are predominently brick). I don't remember seeing weep  holes in them, but maybe I just missed them. Inquiring minds need to know and I will need to check that next time I'm in the UK.

Posted by Denise Hamlin, Broker/Owner, Helping Happy Clients Make Smart Choices (Cardinal Realty ~ 319-400-0268) over 9 years ago

Katherine - it is likely to come up many more times!

Nancy - happy to add to your filing cabinet...

Anna - I don't know how they could be installed on concrete block houses.  This technique weeps the space between the bricks and wood.

Randy - the new stuccoes have weep screeds behind, because they learned that when no moisture can eliminate it causes a lot of rot and molds inside.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Richard - glad to help inform yet another real estate or sales professional!

Susan - they are out there, lurking...

Bill - an arrow here and another there and pretty soon you are armed!

Denise - an older house that has a brick structure does not need weep holes!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Very good stuff. While Brick is not as prevelent here in southern California, stucco is SOOOO popular, and one of your replies hit home.

Posted by Brad Rachielles, REALTOR, CDPE, Upland, CA (CENTURY 21 Peak, Ca BRE# 01489453) over 9 years ago

We have a lot of brick  / brick front houses here in Boston and area. Great information I'm armed with now! Thank you!

Posted by Anna Tolstoy (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage) over 9 years ago

Jay, I recently joined our local Builders Association and just yesterday we had an insullation rep in to talk about moisture in and out of the home.  Brick was one of the subjects he covered. He agrees with everything you said.  Thanks for the post...

Posted by Evelyn Johnston, The People You Know, Like and Trust! (Friends & Neighbors Real Estate) over 9 years ago

Jay,

Nice reminder and even better public post. I haven't witnessed any covered holes as of yet and I hope that I don't!

Posted by Greg Nino, Houston, Texas (RE/MAX Compass, formerly RE/MAX WHP) over 9 years ago

Jay,

Nice reminder and even better public post. I haven't witnessed any covered holes as of yet and I hope that I don't!

Posted by Greg Nino, Houston, Texas (RE/MAX Compass, formerly RE/MAX WHP) over 9 years ago

Wow! But then again I have never worked in an area of brick homes. I've worked in hurricane world and shaky crack world only, LOL!

Posted by Vickie Nagy, Vickie Jean the Palm Springs Condo Queen (Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate) over 9 years ago
Just think what would happen to a brick home in a California earthquake. Not pretty!
Posted by Vickie Nagy, Vickie Jean the Palm Springs Condo Queen (Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate) over 9 years ago

Jay, missed this one yesterday... what a wealth of information.... here in Canada most homes are brick or "brick veneer" and I've learned through attending many house inspections to look for these weep holes, and have come across many that have been closed up by an uninformed home owner.

Posted by Gloria Valvasori, Accredited Senior Agent, REAL Experience | REAL Commitment | REAL Results! (BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE SIGNATURE SERVICE) over 9 years ago

About 10 years ago we had a builder around here who built a good chunk of a subdivision without using brick ties. The brick facades of certain homes would "slap" againt the frame with a thud and scare the heck out of the homeowners. Not great!

Posted by Bradley Pounds, (512) 736-3353 (Watters International Realty, Broker Lic #606049) over 9 years ago

Jay...

We run into this a lot, where all of those weep holes have been "repaired" by someone along the way. Thanks for the good info.

Posted by Richard Weisser, Richard Weisser Retired Real Estate Professional (Richard Weisser Realty) over 9 years ago

thanks for the post...it is interesting that the homeowners might decided to fill in the holes instead of just asking...ugh

Posted by Jeffrey DiMuria 321.223.6253 Waves Realty, Florida Space Coast Homes (Waves Realty) over 9 years ago

aaahhhh Jay, Now your talking my second language....  I know more about brick than probably I want to.  You see my husband is a brick mason for over 40 years.  So is his brother, my nephews, my husband father and my brother-in-law on the other side etc. etc.  Yes, weep holes are important along with weep ropes, vents etc.  (Brick Humor - You know what brickers call the cultured or fake stone they put up?  Lickum and Stickum stone.)  #35 Post - Brick facing can come apart for a variety or reasons, each case is different.  Some times the roof load is to heavy and it pushes against the front making it separate.  Some times the angle iron could not support the weight - or was not long enough.  You really need a professional to take a look at this.  Thanks Jay.

Posted by Kimberly Thurm, Broker / Relocation Consultant ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR (Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff, Naperville, IL) over 9 years ago

Jay, I guess I never paid attention to why they were there. Learn something new every day. Thanks.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA over 9 years ago

I absolutely love this kind of technical article. I'm sort of a Real Estate geek.  Excellent illustrations.

Posted by Bob Jenkins (Century 21 Foothill) over 9 years ago

I just sent out a repair request and the buyer was asking the seller to make weep holes per the inspection report.  I hope there isn't a problem with making them after the fact.

Posted by Team Honeycutt (Allen Tate) over 9 years ago

Well, Brad, brick or stucco, weeping is essential.  Like my mother used to do over my report cards.  You gotta let the moisture out.

Lock and load Anna.  Glad you're armed!

Evelyn - he did!!  Well, waddayano!  Actually this isn't rocket science, but mysterious to some people!

C'mon Greg!  You ain't lived until you've seen plugged weep holes!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Vickie - don't know how they work out there!  But don't close off the weep holes or the earthquake can't escape ...  or something like that.

Gloria - then you know of which I speak!  Glad you're aboard!

Bradley - EXCELLENT!  Great builders are everywhere, thank goodness...  Were there weep holes so the sound waves could escape?

Richard - common practice nationwide, apparently.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

In Texas, brick veneer is the most common, well before the 70's. People fill in the weep holes because they think it prevents bugs from getting into the house. They don't understand there is a barrier, but I show houses all the time when them filled. Some people don't put actual mortor, but they'll put brillow pads, but then those rust and run and look bad...

Posted by Donna Harris, Realtor,Mediator,Ombudsman,Property Tax Arbitrator (Donna Homes, powered by JPAR - TexasRealEstateMediationServices.com) over 9 years ago

Jeffrey - quicker and easier to just plug it up!

Have some experience Kim?  Are you weeping now that there is yet ANOTHER mention of bricks?

Michael - happy to contribute to that learning!  Michelangelo at 87 said, "I am still learning."  He had quite a resume...

Bob - happy to meet the geek.  I try to be instructive.

Allen - nope!  If I don't see them I put that on my report.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Donna - Brillo pads would be a first for me!  And that would get really ugly over time.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Well, I didn't know that.  I guess since we don't have many brick homes out here in Southern CA, I won't kick myself too hard for not knowing... thanks for the info ;-)

Posted by Phil & Celeste Pafford, Corona Short Sale Broker (PaffordHomes.com, Corona CA) over 9 years ago

You are welcome Phil!  And I did not know until this post that you don't have brick homes in CA!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Had non existant weep holes on a home a month back. I actually wrote about it myself.

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 9 years ago

Jay,  lol - I have even made mortar in the mixers for a new construction job...  When we built one of our homes.   Over a hundred tons of stone went up on that one.

Posted by Kimberly Thurm, Broker / Relocation Consultant ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR (Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff, Naperville, IL) over 9 years ago

And I probably commented Jim!  Sorry, didn't remember.  When I see no weeps I mention it and tell them they really are needed.

Kimberly - he's not heavy, he's my brother, um house!  When I need heavy stuff moved, I will call you!   ;)

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

OMG! That sounds just like something I'd do... diligently fill all of those holes. Like the time the contractor told me he'd never seen so much calk around a shower, courtesy of Nana.

Posted by Kate Kate over 9 years ago

Well, Nana, don't do that!  It's against the rules, and now you know that.

Where you been?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

PahPah, Hmmm... I HAVE been known to break the rules once or twice. I have been having fun working on my new website. Have a fabulous Thanksgiving with your new grandson. Nana

Posted by Kate Kate over 9 years ago

Jay, the only thing about the 3/8 hole in the mortor joint is very easily clogged with dirt, etc. I some times see the full weep hole clogged.  3/8 is way to small.

Posted by Jack Gilleland (Home Inspection and Investor Services, Clayton) over 9 years ago

Kate Na - he is in Utah and I in Virginia.  We will share it vicariously over the cosmic waves.

I agree Jack.  And on some houses they are putting them everywhere!  I like a gap big enough for a medium snake to get in...  um, not a plumber's snake.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago
Jay - Unlike Virginia, we don't have a lot of homes with bricks down here but I am always happy to learn something new!
Posted by Barbara-Jo Roberts Berberi, MA, PSA, TRC - Greater Clearwater Florida Residential Real Estate Professional, Palm Harbor, Dunedin, Clearwater, Safety Harbor (Charles Rutenberg Realty) over 9 years ago

And I am glad you are Barbara-Jo!  Like Michelangelo said, "I am always learning."

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

Thank you so much for sharing this information about why brick home needs to weep.  The builders in my area use wicks in the mortar joints for this purpose.  Great information to share with everyone.

Posted by Diane Williams over 9 years ago

Wicks are one way the industry is doing it now, but I think holes are still better Diane.  Either way though, it needs to eliminate moisture!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

When I read the title, I thought you were speaking of WEEPING MORTAR, which is a whole other subject!  I don't care for weepig mortar, as I like nice even appearances...

Posted by Pat Tasker, Your Milwaukee Metro Area Agent (WI) (Shorewest Realtors) over 9 years ago

When I read the title, I thought you were speaking of WEEPING MORTAR, which is a whole other subject!  I don't care for weepig mortar, as I like nice even appearances...

Posted by Pat Tasker, Your Milwaukee Metro Area Agent (WI) (Shorewest Realtors) over 9 years ago

Pat - if by that you mean the white stain that flows from it, that means there was too much lime in the mix and as the mortar gets wet it weeps out the lime.  You are right, it is NOT attractive!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 9 years ago

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