What I'm Seeing Now

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Watch Your Weight!

A recent inspection proved interesting.  Aren't they all?  This was a house purchased on auction and remodeled.  I don't know if that qualifies as a flip, but probably.

The house was built in 1978, and that is significant.  Why?  Because of architecture.

The remodel job was beautiful at first glance.  There were the usual things.  A lot of electrical wiring problems hidden in the attic were the most prominent.  And a gas furnace and water heater crammed into a small closet and unable to breath.

But there is more.  As I said, the architecture is important.

One of the biggest differences between houses built in 1978 and now is that modern interiors have lots of open space.  Big rooms, expansive openings between rooms, high ceilings, and so forth.  To accommodate that new construction modern materials were invented and are used.  And those involve new beams and supports not made in 1978 - I-beam floor joists and super-strong beams and posts made of micro-laminated materials.

In order to bring this house to a modern condition the re-modeler decided to open things up.  This can be done, but it is important that the engineering of the original house be paid attention to and that loads are properly accounted for.  Why would you want a remodel that compromises structural integrity?  You wouldn't.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is wrong with the work in the photo on the left?  You can see above that this house is a ranch.  It is located on a slope, with a full basement.  In 1978 this structure was done with a center, load-bearing wall in the basement.  The upper level was the same, with its center wall resting on the other.  The roof trusses rested on the center wall that bisected the house.  Loads transferred perfectly.  In those days rooms were rectangular or square, with four walls and small door openings.  The widest opening between rooms would have been about 6'.

On the photo on the left (and the work is beautiful) you can see that the center wall has been removed.  This stresses the roof structure, as the joist rafters must now support a 32' span instead of 16'.  They weren't made for that.  Secondly, look into the dining room and notice that the new kitchen wall is no longer resting on the center support underneath.  That offset is readily seen in the photo on the right.

Are those both problems?  I think so, as the structure has been changed in ways 1978 materials were not designed to handle.  Were accommodations made to account for the new load transfers?  No.

Additionally, more load has been added.

Modern home buyers love granite in the kitchen.  Granite is heavy.  In the photo on the right above you can see how far the new counter top extends into the room.  Additionally, we have new cabinets and hardwood flooring.  What supports that below?

And they have added an island, though not too large, something seldom seen in 1978 construction.

This kitchen is beautiful.  But those loads may be too heavy for what is supporting them.  This is a new DEAD load.

When you have a get together, where does everyone end up?

In the kitchen!  And if given purchase to hang around, like an island or long counter top, that is where people will go.  That will add even more weight.  And this is also where hosts will set the food to which people will gravitate.  That introduces a new LIVE load.  I thought that was a problem.  There are stresses to the structure overhead and underneath.  Call an engineer...

My recommendation:  one thing I always look for in new construction and remodeling is load support and transfer.  It MUST be accommodated for.  Any time you walk through a house, watch your weight!  You could be the live load that adds the straw to the structure's back!

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 66 commentsJay Markanich • September 19 2010 05:49AM

Comments

 We always tell our clients and customers that David (construction backfground) will help with the little mechanical things..support, 2 x 4 vs 2 x 6....plug this, insulate that....and I will discuss the really important things like what color to paint the bedroom...blog on Buddy...enjoy your Sunday !

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Realtors - Luxury - Divorce - Short Sale (Keller Williams 414-525-0563) over 7 years ago

Sally - busy all day at church, but will enjoy it!  I would hope that when you discuss colors you are going for the burgundy and gold motif...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Wow.  So many things to consider when remodeling/fliopping.  Glad we just work on the floors.  When you said 1978 was significant, I thought you were going to talk about lead paint.  LOL.  This sounds pretty serious.  Is there anything they can do at this point?  (or anything that wouldn't have major cosmetic impact?)  I suppose to help support the granite, maybe they could go in basement, and add in some more floor joists or something, but what do you do w/ the rest?

Oh, and I have seen the effect of large granite countertop/new island on a floor.  The floor was floating and had waves of buckles - never saw anything like it before.  Just remembered that the island was on top of the floating floor - big no no. With floating floor, it should have gone in afterwards, not before the island.  This one looks like solid strip nailed in, so at least they got that part right.

Posted by Debbie Gartner, The Flooring Girl & Blog Stylist -Dynamo Marketers (The Flooring Girl) over 7 years ago

This reminds me of a home I remodeled in Bethesda.  A 1952 Cape Cod with no basement.  Since we took out a kitchen wall, the upper level needed support, so we installed steel beam supports encased in columns and put the oven range in it. 

It turned out fabulously and structurally sound. 

You can't just go around taking walls out.  Open spaces have to be supported either by architectural design or beams or something.  Common sense says that supports in older homes must go to the ground through foundation level. 

Or, one can begin to see the home slowly but eventually settle and we know where that goes. 

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 7 years ago

You are right, Debbie - the new HVAC can be too large for the ductwork to support; too much electrical can be added and not supported by the panel box; too much weight can harm the structure.  The house is a package and it all must be considered.  At least they did the hardwood flooring before they put in all the new kitchen stuff.

What can be done?  Not my call.  I suggested they bring in an engineer.  That counter protrusion goes almost all the way to the outside wall and supporting it from underneath would require a post in the center of the family room!

Lenn - Walter Johnson or Whitman area?  I went to WJ...  but lived in Kensington.  We couldn't afford Bethesda!  I know the house you are talking about though.  We see them in VA in Falls Church and Pimmit Hills.

Your remodel sounds fabulous.  And that is the kind of thing that simply HAS to be considered before beginning.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay, this is so important... and so relevent in a community like mine where homes were primarily built in the 60's and 70's.  I will probably link to this from a post in my outside blog one day this week, and I'll send you the link.

Posted by Margaret Woda, Maryland Real Estate & Military Relocation (Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.) over 7 years ago

Let me get this straight. 

Load bearing walls were removed with no other adjustments made? 

Posted by J. Philip Faranda, Broker-Owner (J. Philip Faranda (J. Philip R.E. LLC) Westchester County NY) over 7 years ago

Mr. J that's what the man said.  I think the designer should be held responsible and so on :-)

Posted by James Dray, Exceptional Agents, Outstanding Results (Fathom Realty AR LLC) over 7 years ago

Margaret - it would be very important in houses those ages because people are always trying to make them more "modern."  That is the essence of living - accommodating modern living but buying something that is quaint and cultural.  And thanks for linking!

J. Philip - um, yes!  You can see no adjustments in the main level.  And nothing was changed in the basement except to redo one area into a bedroom and add new carpeting and windows.

Debbie G would like the carpeting.  I thought it was nice, though not burgundy and gold.  

Patterned - not my grandmother's carpeting...   (;>)

That granite kitchen cabinet protrusion is right between those lights, and that bulkhead houses the HVAC and plumbing, as it always has.  No changes!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

James - I think the designer and re-modeler are one in the same!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

I saw this same type of remodel in Portsmouth.  They seemed to have been do-it-yourself jobs.  Took that center wall out and did not make any adjustments.  The buyer had a father in law who was a builder.  He investigated and discovered the issue.  They also installed a huge Koi pond right next to the foundation...where it leaked copious amounts under the house.  Not good planning!  The house was finally foreclosed as they could not find a buyer.

Posted by Kathryn Maguire, Serving Chesapeake, Norfolk, VA Beach (GreatNorfolkHomes.com (757) 560-0881) over 7 years ago

Clearly a support beam is needed. I would also mention to the client to check with the town for approved plans. An engineered would have had to sign off on a major structural change to the home.

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 7 years ago

Kathryn - neither of those things is good!  No wonder they could not find a buyer.

Jim - we discussed that and there are two different comments on my report about finding permits and the final occupancy approval.  An outside engineer would also have had to sign off, if they were to hire one.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

If the work was done properly, it should be very easy for the sellers to prove it.  I'd be interested to hear what happens with this house... I suppose you would to.  Probably won't happen though, will it?

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 7 years ago

Good post Jay, you know they did not recalculate the floor load!

Posted by Dan Edward Phillips, Realtor and Broker/Owner (Dan Edward Phillips) over 7 years ago

Jay, you make some really good points - some things that I think a lot of people don't even consider. Just shows that sometimes you don't know what you don't know.

Posted by Mark Montross, Listing and Buyer Specialist (Catamount Realty Group) over 7 years ago

Reuben - I suggest what I suggest and ask to be kept in the loop, because I want to see what happens too.  But, as you know, that doesn't always happen, does it?

Thanks Dan.  And unless they opened up the ceiling they simply could not.  That is a long span for regular floor joists, especially with such a load.

Mark - hire a home inspector!  This is the kind of stuff we think about!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay:  A prime reason to have a QUALIFIED Home Inspector -- not just when buying or selling, but when considering any remodeling!

Posted by Tish Lloyd, Broker - Wilmington NC and Surrounding Beaches (BlueCoast Realty Corporation) over 7 years ago

Years ago I bought a 3.5 story 1805 abandoned mansion with center halls on all three floors.  On either side of all halls, the original load bearing wall which had separated two rooms, had been removed and replaced with 2 non-load bearing walls to create three apartment rooms.  The result was that there was major sagging and settling, and the house was in danger of internal collapse.

Posted by Brian Schulman, Lancaster County PA RealEstate Expert 717-951-5552 (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Lancaster PA) over 7 years ago

Tish - would that everyone understood that!

Brian - and that could happen!  Especially if a lot of new DEAD load is introduced, and then the LIVE load to follow...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

I have removed load bearing walls and replaced them with sufficiently sized steel or laminated beams. I assume this home never had the new work engineered. Removal of structural elements is not a problem if the new work does the job of supporting the loads.

Posted by Paul Lesieur (203kloanmn) over 7 years ago

As a fellow inspector, I know where you are comeing from. The worst ones are the remodels, they try to hide (in most cases) all or most of the defects. But we as inspectors it's our job to find them good post.

Posted by Clint Mckie, Desert Sun Home, Comm. Inspection 1-575-706-5586 (Desert Sun Home, commercial Inspections) over 7 years ago

I know someone who knows someone who opened up a house like this that was built in 1981 in Florida (no basements). Okay, it was me. If it passed inspection every step of the way, is that good enough or should I be concerned? I have a tenant in there now.

Posted by Ellie Drury, ABR,CRS,CDPE,ePRO (Home Run Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Excellent post.  It's expensive to make a functionally obsolete home into an updated one.  Many buyers just opt for the new construction homes.

Posted by Linda Metallo DiBenardo (Re/max Impact, Lockport, Illinois) over 7 years ago

Great post Jay. At least with this home, the situation was glaring you in the face. I'm sure you'll agree, it's the "minor" remodels that get tricky. ie... The load bearing wall is still there, they just 'scooted it over' 12 inches (off of the support beam underneath).  

Posted by Jeffrey Jonas- Minnesota Home Inspector (Critical Eye Property Inspections / JRJ Consultants) over 7 years ago

Paul - you are right, that's the only way to do it, as I said in the post.

Clint - I have many posts on what I call Flipper, complete with a photo of Flipper!  We have to be very careful with what we are looking at!

Ellie - the key word in your question is "if..."  And it depends on who did, AND APPROVED the work.

Thanks Linda.  You should know that I have more problems on new homes than old.

Jeff - I found that scooted wall once on a pre-drywall inspection!  I couldn't have seen it after the drywall was installed!  As soon as I walked into this house I thought we would have problems.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay, sounds like there weren't any permits taken to do the remodel. The County Inspector would have surely found this problem.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA over 7 years ago

Great blog Jay!  I have done several remodels with my brother (he is a licensed class A contractor), and the last one we opened up a 1974 Colonial.  We did install a 26 foot engineered steel beam in the downstairs great room area.  When doing this we had to install four temporary walls to distribute the load while taking out the center wall  and install the beam.

One question for you, if the basement structure that originally supported the load bearing wall on the main floor is still intact, would the kitchen issue be alleviated?  I can see the issue with the roof/ceiling structure but I was wondering if the previous basement structure was also modified.

Great blog as always!

Posted by Damon Gettier, Broker/Owner ABRM, GRI, CDPE (Damon Gettier & Associates, REALTORS- Roanoke Va Short Sale Expert) over 7 years ago

Weight Watchers for flipping - a great concept and one that sometimes if ignored as you point out - thanks!

Posted by Peggy Noel, Bouchard, ABR, CDPE, SFR (RE/MAX Commonwealth) over 7 years ago

This is interesting and makes you understand why you need a home inspector and structural engineer to review!

Posted by Cheryl Ritchie, Southern Maryland 301-980-7566 (RE/MAX Leading Edge www.GoldenResults.com) over 7 years ago

People are always asking, during the course of an inspection, if they can just knock out this wall and that. I am very reluctant to go there. I do not want to be the goat if it does not work out to suit them.

Posted by Steven L. Smith, Bellingham WA Home Inspector (King of the House Home Inspection, Inc.) over 7 years ago

Very interesting.  Many years ago and long before I ever considered going into real estate we remodeled our kitchen.  I remember being so annoyed that the designer kept talking about weight.  I wanted the walls I didn't want removed.  I got this lesson from him and, although at the time I didn't ever quite understand, I sure do now.  He ended up doing a beautiful job even though I never could get rid of one annoying wall! 

Posted by Lisa Ackerson, CRS - Dallas Fort Worth Area Expert (Fathom Realty DFW) over 7 years ago

Michael - they admitted that there were no permits.  But had the County been involved (in this case Fairfax) they likely would not have allowed this to go forward without structural alteration.

Damon - the kitchen wall was pushed over a bit.  But nothing was done below to accommodate more weight, so the answer is no, unless they altered the beneath structure.

Peggy - just knocking out two birds with one stone!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

I have done remodels and bearing wall discussions are the first thing we address.....You can also tell a lot from the cracks starting in the street in front of the house, the sidewalks, the garage and walkways, patios and cracks near windows and inside floors.....this is not a profession for the newbie or "green team".....Good post

Posted by Richie Alan Naggar, agent & author (people first...then business Ran Right Realty ) over 7 years ago

Cheryl - both are very important when structures are changed!

Steve - I know what you mean.  In the inspection I recommend they consult with an architect or engineer prior to doing any work.

Lisa - sometimes there is a reason!  Sure seems so in your case.  Good contractor!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Hi Jay,

Great post as always. I have seen several of these, and because of you and other great inspector posters here on the rain, am able to compel buyers to do what should be the obvious...get a qualified HOME INSPECTOR!!!!!!

all the best...

Posted by Bill Saunders, Realtor®, www.BillSellsHotSprings.com (Meyers Realty) over 7 years ago

Richie - and how many "structural professionals" are involved with flips or remodels!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Bill - thanks.  Some things never change with flippers and remodelers and it is important to get an inspection.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

This is one of the best non-technology posts I have read on activerain. It's great to redo a house but if it's not done right and goes undiscovered, ughhhh??? The home inspector and engineer have to be carefully selected! Will you come to Bethesda/Potomac? I live in Luxmanor - Walter Johnson area.

Posted by Betsy Schuman Dodek, SearchPotomacHomes.com (Washington Fine Properties - Washington DC Area Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Excellent post and very thought provoking!  Thank you!

Posted by Alisa McKeel Willson, Certified Res. Appraiser (Appraisal Pros in Texas) over 7 years ago

Wow, this is stuff many of us who don't do rehabbing think about, but we may encounter it with our clients. Thanks for the useful info.

Posted by Bernadine Hunter, SFR, ACRE, "Finding Solution to Your Real Estate Needs" (Keller Williams Greater Columbus Realty) over 7 years ago

Yes good post and back in the 80's I did inspections with pricing for a home warranty group, I was not a building inspector I was a property damage estimator, kind of like an insurance guy. My job was assess and put current pricing on needed repairs which many times were structural and also common was problems like back filling with clay (clay is common here) only have it expand and push the block walls in after a rainy spell..

The problems that came up the most often were from new homebuilders moving walls or mechanicals to allow a deviation from the approved plans.

I saw things that no thinking person would have done and still remember some of the worst to this day. Amazing what some "professionals" try and pull off.

Posted by Paul Lesieur (203kloanmn) over 7 years ago

Jay - Some "flippers" bring nothing to the transaction but a bit of creativity.  Most could use a bit more common sense.

Posted by John Mulkey, Housing Guru (TheHousingGuru.com) over 7 years ago

Another good point to think about when showing homes.  Thanks for the post1

Posted by Jerry Morse, BBA,GRI (The Morse Company) over 7 years ago

This post highlights the importance of having any redesign or reconstruction properly evaluated and most importantly securing the required permits for the work to be done.  No point in a great remodel if it falls down!

Posted by Tony and Suzanne Marriott, Associate Brokers, Serving Scottsdale, Phoenix and Maricopa County AZ (BVO Luxury Group @ Keller Williams Arizona Realty) over 7 years ago

Jay, for sure it is never a good idea to make changes to any house structure if you don't understand how it is built.

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) over 7 years ago

I did a rehab just recently and we did accommodate for opening walls . . .we put a pillar

Posted by Fernando Herboso - Broker for Maxus Realty Group, 301-246-0001 Serving Maryland, DC and Northern VA (Maxus Realty Group - Broker 301-246-0001) over 7 years ago

When clients start talking about opening things up, I usually tell them they need to talk to an architect or someone else who knows much more about that than me.

Posted by Christine Donovan, Broker/Attorney 714-319-9751 DRE01267479 - Costa M (Donovan Blatt Realty) over 7 years ago

I am by no means a structural engineer, but it does amaze me at the number of people I take through houses that just say they are going to take out a wall here or there with no thought about it being load bearing.  Amazing to me.  Great information for the public.

Posted by Lesley Wagstaff, For Real Estate and Mortgages (Re/Max Results Realty in Vancouver, BC) over 7 years ago

It's amazing what some people will do to make a home more open without taking into consiration the structural integrity!

Posted by Jenny Durling, For Los Angeles real estate help 213-215-4758 (L.A. Property Solutions) over 7 years ago

My home was on Jarvis Lane.  I purchased it in 2003 for 363,000 and sold it in 2005 for $700,000.

My sons and I did the remodel.  Fabulous. 

BEFORE

Lenn's House

AFTER

Lenn's House

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) over 7 years ago

Thank you Betsy!  I was just in Gaithersburg last week, so yes, I go over there.

Alisa - thanks and glad you could stop by!

Bernadine - rehabs offer a lot to think about, usually every system in the house.

Paul - I also have a few that I still remember!  And some after more than 20 years!

John - this was creative and very beautiful.  It just lacked what you said, which is NOT uncommon.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jerry - glad you liked it.  Stop by again!

Tony and Suzanne - seldom do flippers or remodelers pull permits anymore.  And I just have to point it out.

Charlie - that's why I said that 1978 is very relevant when you are trying to create 2010.  As you know...

Pillars are the way to go Fernando!  It sure beats air...

Christine - that is good advice that should always be followed.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

And Lesley, you would not be surprised then at how often I see this!

Jenny - and then go about ruining the former structural integrity!

Lenn - that is a beautiful renovation and I can see from the header that it was done properly.  I am disappointed you didn't stick with those three fishes though.  You sure bought and sold at the right time!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Interesting post.  I would be very careful if I'm  invited to the house warming party :)

Posted by Jane Becker, CRS,ASP,ABR,CBR,CDPE,LMC,E-PRO,GRI (Keller Williams Home Team AdvantEdge ) over 7 years ago

Are you nearby Jane?  Lemmino!  I will let you know where the house is...   (;>)

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay, I wonder if that island will collapse eventually from the weight with the wrong supporting structure?

Posted by Gary Woltal, Assoc. Broker Realtor SFR Dallas Ft. Worth (Keller Williams Realty) over 7 years ago

Hard to say Gary.  I think that depends on the live load introduced, and perhaps with time.  Things get weaker, not stronger, with stress and age.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Great info Jay, this is something we as Realtors need to keep tucked away for future use!

Posted by Joan Cox, Denver Real Estate - Selling One Home at a Time (Metro Brokers - House to Home, Inc. - Denver Real Estate - 720-231-6373) over 7 years ago

Thanks Joan.  There are many things to consider during home inspections that most buyers aren't even aware of.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Good points! I will keep this in mind while looking at older re molded houses

Posted by Rayna Mckay (RE/MAX Real Estate Advocates) over 7 years ago

Rayna -  Thanks!  Older homes are where you are more likely to run into this, and especially after major renovations.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

A rehab like that would need a building permit and meet building codes. Did this property have a building permit that the city approved?

If my client was interested in a home with that type of major modification I would advise them to get a copy of the work permits and ask the seller for paid receipts to make sure the work was done to code, and that the contractors had been paid, so my client would not get a surprise mechanics lein after move in.

Owners title insurance does not cover a lein that's placed on a property after the policy is issued. And in AZ the contractors have 120 days from completion of work to place the lein, which takes priority as of the day of start of work.

Posted by Bill Travis, Broker/Owner (Captain Bill Realty, LLC) over 7 years ago

All circumspect Bill.  We discussed that during the inspection.  I always do.  Later I learned that there was no permit, as I suspected.  From there I don't know where things stand.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

Jay,

What an excellent post. I was reading and looking at the  photos as you were discussing the issues, and boy, how easy to see the niceties and miss on the big and serious issues

Posted by Jon Zolsky, Daytona Beach, FL, Buy Daytona condos for heavenly good prices (Daytona Condo Realty, 386-405-4408) over 7 years ago

As did my clients Jon!  It was all beautiful, there's no denying that.  But the underlying stuff is the most important.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 7 years ago

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