What I'm Seeing Now

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Trampo-Floor!

DATELINE:  Northern Virginia – the purchaser of a new home was frantic to find a home inspector to try to evaluate why a floor in his home under construction moves up and down. The dining room floor bounces. And not a little bit!

Looking on the Internet, this purchaser was able to find a local home inspector. His popular website offered just the relief this purchaser needed. He determined to get in touch with the website’s principle inspector. Well, it’s only inspector!

Forensic Detective, aka Home Inspector, Jay Markanich, was called to the scene. The home’s purchaser noticed what he thought was a real give to the floor in question. He had brought it up to the supervisor who dismissed it as “normal.” The builder was scheduled to install drywall the next day, which prompted this purchaser to make an emergency call to the Detective.

Detective Markanich came as soon as he was able. And just in time!

Arriving at the scene, Jay was able to prove, to himself and to his client, that this floor was indeed the jumping experience! Detective Jay called it Trampo-Floor, an area almost 3’ wide, and at one end of the room. And it was right in front of a large hole in the dining room wall, about 2’ square, and rimmed entirely with metal. The detective was able to confidently answer his client’s question as to what this hole was intended to be. One of the main level’s HVAC returns!

Not a fan of a return low on the wall in a dining room (Jay’s opinion is that such a placement inhibits the ability to place furniture where desired and can add annoying background noise to dinner conversation), Detective Markanich pointed out that the wall housing the opening was a load-bearing wall, and likely right on top of a steel beam.

Having not been to the basement yet, the Detective determined to see if what he suspected was in fact the case. It was a quick trip to the basement. With his client in tow Detective Markanich turned the corner and made his way to the underside of the dining room.

This is what he found!

Just as suspected! While perhaps not the work of Hammerman, this was certainly the work of Sawman. HVAC guys have a tendency to, um, move things out of the way of duct work they want to install! This case was no exception. This is NOT "normal."

This floor was bouncing because the end of a floor joist was cut!  And bouncing right on top of a gas line!  Yikes!

And the next day the underside of the dining room would have been covered over completely with drywall!

After that it would have been very difficult to determine why such a bounce was present. And much harder to fix!

No wonder the builder did not give this purchaser much notice before announcing the drywall installation!

This reporter’s recommendation: Get a pre-drywall inspection! It is the only time you will have to inspect a house while skeletal! Home inspectors do not have X-ray vision! They may have a good sense of construction and location of things in a home, but the more experienced they are the less they are able to see inside walls. Take the hint…

Oh, Detective Markanich was able to find a bunch of other things which he suspects put off drywall installation a couple of days. The purchaser was, shall we say, grateful! As to the drywall installation? Well, curses, foiled again!

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 104 commentsJay Markanich • August 15 2010 06:55AM

Comments

Kudos to Detective Jay!   Even I know that a bouncing gas line is NOT a good idea.  Of course, had the drywall already been installed, you could have used your x-ray vision!!!!

Posted by Wallace S. Gibson, CPM, LandlordWhisperer (Gibson Management Group, Ltd.) about 8 years ago

I am glad that the buyer called you just in time. Thanks for the post.

Posted by Gita Bantwal, REALTOR,ABR,CRS,SRES,GRI - Bucks County & Philadel (RE/MAX Centre Realtors) about 8 years ago

JayMan maybe could have used his X-ray vision.

But he was unavailable for this inspection.

I was glad Snidely was foiled again...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Thanks Gita.  Let's hurry and install that drywall - gotta keep the schedule!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Mark my word Mr. Markanich I will be back to Re-Blog this.  Very important to have a detective like you on the job when a home is being built.

Posted by Maureen McCabe, Columbus Ohio Real Estate (HER Realtors) about 8 years ago

Nice job on those trusses by Sawman. You have to think the HVAC installer must of figured no will know until everyone is long gone into the sunset. There is simply no excuse for workmanship like that.

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) about 8 years ago

Jay - An excellent story to help explain why it is important to have inspections throughout construction.

Posted by FN LN about 8 years ago

Jay, Just curious, what's the proper way to fix this?

Bill

Posted by Liz and Bill Spear, RE/MAX Elite Warren County OH (Cincinnati/Dayton) (RE/MAX Elite 513.520.5305 www.LizTour.com) about 8 years ago

hey "super spector ...good work...i think should consider a cape as part of your inspector attire...wouldn't

the municipality have had a pre-drywall inspection ? They do here...

 

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Realtors - Luxury - Divorce (EXP Realty 414-525-0563) about 8 years ago

Maureen - there are more and more "professionals" installing things in new construction in ways that are not best practice or professional!  Phase inspections on new construction are essential.

Jim - that guy knew that in a couple of years, after a gas leak or more structural failure, they would never be able to pin this cut truss on him.  You are right, it is inexcusable.

Marc - that was some reporter!  And right on the scene - covered the who, what, where, when and why!

Liz and Bill - that cut truss needs to have a few more inches shaved off and a 90 degree truss put in front of it (you can see the old one they put in the wrong place originally).  Then this cut truss needs to be lifted up and attached to the new support, with straps!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Yes, this was already looked at and "approved" by the "local jurisdictional authority"  Sally!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Excellent Jay! You are not only an excellent inspector but having the ability to write so well about your findings is truly a find! I have a couple of excellent inspectors here whom I recommend to my clients but whenever I suggest they should blog about their experiences it goes ove like a lead balloon. Keep 'em coming!

Posted by SarahGray Lamm, Realtor - 100K Hours of NC Real Estate Experience (Allen Tate Realtors Chapel Hill, NC 919-819-8199 ) about 8 years ago

Out of sight....

Drywall - the cobbler's best friend.

Posted by Keith Sellers, Greater Kalamazoo and Lakeshore (Sellers Real Estate) about 8 years ago

This is very telling and typical post about new constructions.. .often times I seen workers  complain about each other and competition amongst them are the norm. 

Posted by Fernando Herboso - Broker for Maxus Realty Group, 301-246-0001 Serving Maryland, DC and Northern VA (Maxus Realty Group - Broker 301-246-0001) about 8 years ago

Wow Jay. THis AC guy was not too bright. Sawing through a support to put in duct work. What will they think of next!

Posted by Bryant Tutas, Selling Florida one home at a time (Tutas Towne Realty, Inc and Garden Views Realty, LLC) about 8 years ago

SarahGray - well, thank you!  Do your inspectors have websites?  They SHOULD.  And blogging is one thing that helps propel the site to the top so they get found.  I get 5 or 6 inspections every week just from my website!  And that's in addition to my referred inspections.

Keith - drywall covers a multitude of sins!

Fernando - unfortunately there is not much cream that rises to the top...

Bryant - this happens more often then we know!  They feel entitled to make room for their installations.  Did my blog roar?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

A cut truss? Ouch... I just crossed my legs and started to perspire a little. 

Posted by J. Philip Faranda, Broker-Owner (J. Philip Faranda (J. Philip R.E. LLC) Westchester County NY) about 8 years ago

LOL...thanks for the morning chuckle - and eye opener.  Always be diligent!

Posted by Susan Haughton, Susan & Mindy Team...Honesty. Integrity. Results. (Long and Foster REALTORS (703) 470-4545) about 8 years ago

J. Philip - it is interesting that the buyer felt something was wrong, but did not know what.  The supervisor?  He said it was "normal..."  Hmmmmm.

Susan - to say the least!  Glad you got a chuckle out of it.  Although it really may have developed into a serious circumstance!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Interesting case for the Detective! A valid point - once the drywall goes up you never know what lies beneath - until a problem appears.

Posted by Gary L. Waters Broker Associate, Bucci Realty, Fifteen Years Experience in Brevard County (Bucci Realty, Inc.) about 8 years ago

You 'da man Jay! Just goes to show why "new home" inspections are critical. Most people assume that since it's new, there can't possibly be anything wrong with it. Professional inspectors such as you and I are disspelling that myth one home at a time. Eventually the general public will learn. Keep up the fantastic work and thanks for the great blog. 

Posted by Jeffrey Jonas- Minnesota Home Inspector (Critical Eye Property Inspections / JRJ Consultants) about 8 years ago

Jay, I can't believe the supervisor would write this off as normal just to get the drywall people in the next day. This proves the importance of new home inspections. Good detective work.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA about 8 years ago

And it's hard to evaluate at that point Gary, and even harder to repair.

Jeff - thank you!  And how often have you heard from clients that the builder says there have already been 100 inspections on the place, a private inspection is not needed?

Michael - sometimes when I hear of problems over the phone, like this one, I am thinking it will be hard to evaluate and I might have to bring in an engineer.  This one turned out to be easy!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Glad you were able to solve this mystery before it becae serious. Imagine what could have happened if the gas line broke after the home was occupied.

Posted by Scott Fogleman, New Home Team (New Home Team 804-573-9592) about 8 years ago

Jay....that's horrifying.....imagine the danger if the floor hit the gas line and snapped it....

Posted by Susan Morrison (RE/MAX Executive Realty) about 8 years ago

That is unbelievable.  I really am amazed how people are too lazy to do the right thing.  I think you need a home inspection even more in a new home.

Posted by Yvette Chisholm, Associate Broker - Rockville, MD 301-758-9500 (Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.) about 8 years ago

HA!  The last home inspection my buyers had on new construction showed that the garage wasn't "connected" to the house. 

A strong wind anyone????

Posted by Lenn Harley, Real Estate Broker - Virginia & Maryland (Lenn Harley, Homefinders.com, MD & VA Homes and Real Estate) about 8 years ago

jay, how lucky was the new homeowner to be around & have the knowledge to call an inspector right away...great information to bring forth on new construction potential issues...thanks

Posted by Ginny Gorman, Homes for Sale in North Kingstown RI and beyond (RI Real Estate Services ~ 401-529-7849~ RI Waterfront Real Estate) about 8 years ago

Glad this buyer was persistent ands sought professional assistance quickly!  It's amazing what some builders will try to pass off as "normal" and OK.  Stuff like this is really annoying to me.

Posted by Ralph Janisch ABR CRS Broker, Selling Northwest Houston to good people like you! (Janisch & Co.) about 8 years ago

Yikes! As always though, a delightful read.  I adore your blog!  How do the builders react to your findings generally?  Is it hostile or a sheepish reaction?

 

Posted by Joel Weihe, Helping you to use your VA home loan benefits (Realty World Alliance) about 8 years ago

a definite re-blog... I'm so frequently asked... "why should be bother with the time and expense of an inspection... it's new construction and it's all guaranteed!"

Posted by Alan May, Helping you find your way home. (Coldwell Banker Residential) about 8 years ago

Gee Jay...thank goodness that the GAS LINE would support the weight of the wall AND the China Cabinet with 500 lbs of china...Lol.  Wow...

Posted by Bill Saunders, Realtor®, www.BillSellsHotSprings.com (Meyers Realty) about 8 years ago

Scott - this would have been a big deal had it not been found!

Michael - I was surprised not to find a line waiting for a go on the bouncy, bouncy!

Susan - this was a huge problem waiting to happen!

Yvette - that is my experience.  I find many problems in new construction.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Lenn - amazing but, unfortunately, NOT surprising!

Ginny - you are welcome!  I was happy to take the call!

Ralph - if this is normal, I wonder what abnormal would be!  I am bothered too...

Thank you Sheree!  Their reaction depends on the thing found.  I have had whole developments condemned because of a mistake found in one townhouse.  The County thought that mistake, a serious structural issue, was probably made in all the other townhouses and gues what, it was!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Alan - guaranteed?  Define that!  And it depends on the builder's post-construction record - will they fix it?

Bill - well, it is a large gas pipe!  The wall was on the steel beam, but the live load (cabinets, et al) in the dining room would not be!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Jay,

That is an interesting post. I can imagine all the hoopla in progress.

Posted by Steven L. Smith, Bellingham WA Home Inspector (King of the House Home Inspection, Inc.) about 8 years ago

There were a lot more things on this house Steve.  This one just added to the hoopla!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Always an interesting read.  Continually reinforces the NEED for inspections and at the proper time.

Posted by Mel Ahrens, MBA, Kelly Right Real Estate, Customized Choices for your Real Estate Needs (Kelly Right Real Estate) about 8 years ago

Jay,

That makes a lot of sense. Have a home inspector examine the construction a few times during the process. It's much easier for the builder to repair before anything else has been added and builders don't like to rip things out.

Thanks for the post. I wouldn't have thought of this, but it makes a lot of sense.

Brian

Posted by Brian Madigan, LL.B., Broker (RE/MAX West Realty Inc., Brokerage (Toronto)) about 8 years ago

Jay - Its always so pleasing to see how the HVAC in the attic is run down here. The installers just flip the claw hammer around and chip out the opening they need through any obstacle in their path... We always recommend our purchaser getting an inspection and attending every walkthrough...

Posted by Brent & Deb Wells, Prosper TX (LivingWell Properties) about 8 years ago

Nice job, Detective Jay!  It’s shocking enough that the HVAC guy cut the floor joist to “…get it out of the way.”  What’s more shocking is that the supervisor dismissed the construction as “normal.” 

Posted by Bill Burchard, Broker, Realtor, Representing Buyers and Sellers (3B Realty: 951-347-3818, CA) about 8 years ago

Jay, did Croakster bouncing across the floor find this for you?

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) about 8 years ago

Hi Jay~  That is why all homebuyers need someone like you on their side so that these kind of things can be stopped in their tracks!

Posted by Vickie McCartney, Broker, Real Estate Agent Owensboro KY (Maverick Realty) about 8 years ago

Yikes !  Hard to believe that would have been left that way.  Well done !

Posted by Bill Gillhespy, Fort Myers Beach Realtor, Fort Myers Beach Agent - Homes & Condos (16 Sunview Blvd) about 8 years ago

Jay,

I don't think I have ever seen anyone cut a floor joist. That's just too bizarre.

Posted by Terry Chenier (Homelife Glenayre Realty) about 8 years ago

Jay -

What happened to common sense in home building?  Glad this homeowner found you.  Would love to hear a follow up on what the contractor did/said in response.

MB

Posted by Michael Bergin, Northern Virginia Real Estate (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - ABR - SRES ) about 8 years ago

Jay, Owning a handyman business, I deal with lots of these new construction problems, and the worst I've had to quote on is a home with no water barrier. Maybe next is the master bedroom/bathroom over the garage that they forget to insulate so the pipes freeze every winter.

Love your story and my bouncy floors are usually under tile when the foundation isn't level.

 

Posted by Tina Gleisner, Home Tips for Women (Home Tips for Women) about 8 years ago

Jay - My question would be: Where is the builder or his rep?  It's obvious they aren't doing their job.  Just another reason to make a pre-drywall inspection a must.

Posted by John Mulkey, Housing Guru (TheHousingGuru.com) about 8 years ago

Jay, I think this is an excellent suggestion and one I had not considered before.  I will definitely pass this on to new construction home buyers as a must to find deficiencies that can be hidden by drywall.

Posted by Tammie White, Broker, Franklin TN Homes for Sale (Franklin Homes Realty LLC) about 8 years ago

Mel and Gretchen - there is a real need, you are right, and experience is essential when hiring an inspector.

Brian - happy to contribute to your well of knowledge!

Brent and Deb - attics are used here too and they do the same things!

Bill - I often wonder if the supervisors see stuff like this.  Then I come along and in an hour find a dozen problems!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

I'm glad you were called in when you wee.  That could have been disastrous if it had damaged the gas line!  And I love the way you tell the story - quite the true detective tale!

Posted by Susan Neal, Fair Oaks CA & Sacramento Area Real Estate Broker (RE/MAX Gold, Fair Oaks) about 8 years ago

Charlie - had Croakster been along, he would have made quite the object lesson!

Vickie - would that all home buyers understood that as you do!

Bill - and the guy who cut it thought he would be long gone before it was found...

Terry - unfortunately I see it all the time!  It is horrendous and not professonal.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Michael - I think I will be called to do a final inspection and maybe then I could report!

Tina - freezing pipes over garages is very common here too.  And don't your tiles crack when they move that much?

John - interestingly, the local jurisdicational authority passed the house making it okay to install the drywall.  How much time do you think they spent on their inspection?

Tammie - that would be a very wise suggestion every time you have a new home buyer!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Thank you Susan, for all your nice words!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

I love reading your posts - I learn so much from them!!! And every one is a great example of why a GREAT home inspector is needed!!!

Posted by Barbara-Jo Roberts Berberi, MA, PSA, TRC - Greater Clearwater Florida Residential Real Estate Professional, Palm Harbor, Dunedin, Clearwater, Safety Harbor (Charles Rutenberg Realty) about 8 years ago

Thank you Barbara-Jo!  Again...  The market is such that inspectors are needed more and more.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Jay, this is a perfect case in point why we always recommend that buyers have a professional home inspection even when building a new home. In fact, we recommend slab, pre-drywall and punch list inspections. Good thing the buyer was able to get you there before drywall was put up!

Posted by Sharon Alters, Realtor - Homes for Sale Fleming Island FL (Coldwell Banker Vanguard Realty - 904-673-2308) about 8 years ago

Sharon - he was frantic enough to search the Internet and found me.  Good thing my website activity has me pop up when people look!  It is hard to keep your rank high enough to be found like that.  Yes, various inspections may be needed with each house!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

It makes you wonder how many other new homes--particularly the same design, built by the same crews--also have that problem.

Posted by Donald Tepper, DC area investor helping heirs of inherited homes (Long and Foster) about 8 years ago

Typically, Don, a mistake follows from house to house.  This is not a custom home, so it may be that there are others the HVAC company cut the truss out too.  I won't know until I inspect it!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

There has to be more shoddy work by this builder to be investigated during the process.  I wonder why the new homeowners would purchase a home built under such circumstances. Does this builder have a reputation to consider or are they volume builders?

Posted by Kathy Fuhriman (Bear River Valley Realty) about 8 years ago

This is a perfect example of why a home inspection can be more critical in new construction than in a re-sale.  This would have been a nightmare when the current buyer tried to re-sale in the future! 

Thanks to the Caped Crusader for foiling the Evil Subcontractor and his minion Tight Scheduler!

Posted by Donnie Worley (A Team Real Estate Professionals) about 8 years ago

Volume builders to be sure Kathy.  There were many more things, all of which postponed the drywall installation.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Donnie - I have recommended, and done, pre-drywall inspections for many years.

 

Is this what you meant by Caped Crusader?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Good catch!  I'm in a home improvement company, and I'm ALWAYS glad for the inspector.  He keeps me on the right, and helps me fix previous problems.

 

Posted by Jeremy Wrenn, Founder, Wrenn Home Improvements about 8 years ago

Excellant post and something all agents that sell new homes should think about......and remember for the next one, get your inspector lined up.

Posted by Woody Edwards, A Realtor® Who Answers His Phone! (First Choice Realty, Inc) about 8 years ago

What was the outcome? Did the builder repair? Did the purchaser buy?

Posted by Robert Amato (Bob Amato of Empire Home Mortgage Inc) about 8 years ago

What was the outcome? Great post! So great I have subscribed to your blog, thanks for the pertinent information!

Posted by Valerie Duncan Stewart, Real Estate Agent-Broker, OKC, OK ((Metro First Realty)) about 8 years ago

That piece of equipment is the same size and in the same location in all the houses.  If I was the contractor I would be asking the designer why the floor joists weren't designed to accomodate the equipment in the first place.  I understand that field modification has to happen on every project, but it should be the exception and not the rule.  It is even worse when it happens on a tract home.

I work with a builder here that will have the truss companies engineer out to certify any floor or roof truss that has been cut.  The person doing the Architectural drawings should make sure the framing and mechanical drawings match, even if they are done by another company.

Posted by Loren Green, Phoenix Home Inspector & Designer (Greens Home Design L.L.C.) about 8 years ago

So good for you!  There's always a reason, but sometimes it's hidden......    Well sleuthed!

Posted by Dagny Eason, Fairfield County CT, CDPE Homes For Sale and Condo (Dagny's Real Estate) about 8 years ago

Jeremy - good to see you work with inspectors.  I wish more home improvement guys did!

Woody - I have been recommending these inspections for years.

Empire - they emailed me to say the builder did repair it, but I don't know if they got it off the gas line.

Valerie - I try to be instructive, but some of my posts are silly too.  Glad to have you subscribe!

You are right Loren.  All should pay attention to see how drawings mesh.  Field modification goes on in every home probably, but this one was a bit severe!  And it was certainly not "normal."

Dagny - a regular Hardy Boy!  This one wasn't too hard to figure out!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Like having a built in trampoline.

Great work detective, We look forward to more of your novels in the series

Enjoy the day

Posted by Anonymous about 8 years ago

I sold a resale a number of years ago with a cut ...  something structural...  I would guess the house was 20 years old.  I can not remember a lot about it except learning that HVAC contractors don't worry much about what gets in their way, they have a saw.  One thing I remember being an issue was the sellers had the same home inspection company when they bought and it was not an issue...  not the same home inspector but same company. I always wondered if it was noted on their home inspection.  I am glad it was on my buyers. 

Respected builder...  I don't think there was bouncy floor, the house had not fallen down...

I am a big fan of your posts Jay.

Posted by Maureen McCabe, Columbus Ohio Real Estate (HER Realtors) about 8 years ago

Love the title of this post.   I am so glad that the homeowners found you in time!

Posted by Sharon Parisi, Dallas Homes (United Real Estate Dallas ) about 8 years ago

Love the title of this post.   I am so glad that the homeowners found you in time!

Posted by Sharon Parisi, Dallas Homes (United Real Estate Dallas ) about 8 years ago

That is a WOW moment! Bouncy definitely needs to be investigated!

Posted by Celeste "SALLY" Cheeseman, (RA) AHWD CRS ePRO OAHU HAWAII REAL ESTATE (Liberty Homes) about 8 years ago

I was hoping someone had actually invented and installed a Trampo-Floor in a house... not compromising structural integrity, of course!

Posted by Benjamin Clark, Buyer's Agent - Certified Negotiation Expert (Homebuyer Representation, Inc.) about 8 years ago

Unknown Commenters - hadn't considered a series of these, but there are so many structural issues it would not be hard to compile one!

Maureen - I have heard that too, but on another site I offended an HVAC guy!  Thanks for being a fan!

Sharon - I'm glad too!  I try to come up with clever titles, but don't always succeed.

Sally - it was a wow moment.  I was surprised not to find a line of guys waiting to have a go on the floor!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Benjamin - personally I would LOVE to see that!  How fun would that be?!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Dear Detective,

I love working with inspectors like you.  I have learned an incredible amount in the 4+years I've been in real estate, and much of it is due to my favorite local inspector. 

I will never forget the house I showed with a trampoline floor - not just 3 feet, either, it was the majority of both floors of a very old house, especially the upper floor.  The kids loved it, as that was to be their bedroom and the bounce just tickled them.  Poking around the dirt-floored and stone foundation basement, we realized the staircase had been moved and not properly supported in the old or new position.  We found a few other major glitches down there, the sellers would not budge on their over-priced offering, and the buyers made the right decision and moved on.

Thanks for an excellent post.

Yvonne Wilder (DBR, Kingston NY)

 

Posted by Yvonne Wilder (Halter Associates Realty) about 8 years ago

New home builders must hate you.  I tell people to get a home inspection even when it is a new home purchase.  And you are correct if given the chance to inspect while building do so.

Posted by Gene Riemenschneider, Turning Houses into Homes (Home Point Real Estate) about 8 years ago

I've never been a huge fan of brand new homes, particularly the subdivision variety. This is terrific advice for both the purchase of a home like that and to point out the possible defects even a brand new home can have - something many new home buyers are specifically looking to avoid when the figure a new home purchase will accomplish this where older homes will have lots of problems. New, older or old, all homes are potential problems and before you move in is the time to do your due diligence and prevent yourself from buying a moneypit!

Great post - thanks!

Stephen Hodge - Ontario

Chestnut Park Real Estate

Posted by Stephen Hodge (Chestnut Park Real Estate Limited, Brokerage) about 8 years ago

Jay,

Very clever story telling!  And who pays for all these "repairs"???  Builder, Buyer, HVAC guy???

Posted by Kathy Opatka, Serving Ocean City, MD, & The Delaware Beaches (RE/MAX CROSSROADS) about 8 years ago

You would be shocked how many times this happens.  Being a Construction Engineer I am always (maybe overly cautious) but have such a fear about the buyer getting further down the line and I get drug into a lawsuit because I didn't badger them to spend the money for a proper "phased" construction inspection.

Linda Jamail Marshall 713-523-4600

Broker/Realtor

Houston Texas Innerloop Specialist

Posted by Linda Jamail Marshall, Broker, ABR,QSC,RECS,ACRE - Innerloop Houston, Tex (Linda Marshall,Houston Texas, Linda Marshall, Realtors®) about 8 years ago

It pays to have a good builder who know what they are doing, very hard to correct a bad situation after the fact.

Posted by Deborah Grimaldi, (401) 837-9633 (Albert Realtors) about 8 years ago

Hi Jay, great post, story of a big problem told with some humor.  Drywall covers many sins.

Posted by Dale Ganfield about 8 years ago

Yvonne - I am glad you learn from inspectors.  That indicates that you are listening.

Gene - you are right.  I am not very popular.

Thanks Stephen.  Often mistakes in the tract homes carry from house to house.

The builder does Kathy, but it may be deducted from the sub who did the work and cost the extra repairs.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Nice job Jay!

It is good to see all the positive comments from the real estate community.

We have sometimes been given a hardtime from the listing agent when one of our inspectors finds a significant problem on new construction.

 

 

Posted by Jon Boyd, Ann Arbor Real Estate Buyers Agent (Home Buyer's Agent of Ann Arbor) about 8 years ago

Linda - you are right.  I see it often.  And for some reason it is done a lot by HVAC guys!

Deborah - the builder is only as good as the supervisor on site every day and the sub contractors.  At least that is what I tell my clients...

Dale - thanks!  Huge problem.  I am told it was repaired, but I have not seen it since to know that.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Jon - that is the BEST time to find problems!  Any agent giving you a hard time for something like this should not be an agent.

P.s.  My legal name is Jon!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Great one Jay. So much for supervisor flub-a-dub trying to hide what was going on. Lucky they also had a basement because you could see what had been clearly done. Sproing! goes the dining room!

Posted by Lyn Sims and the Blog Dog (Streamwood, Elgin IL Real Estate - RE/MAX Suburban) about 8 years ago

Thanks Lyn!  I am not sure he was trying to hide, but certainly wanted to keep that schedule on track!

By the way, Blog Dog looks almost as fun as mine, which is quite the compliment!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Jay:  Scary story, great advice, thanks for sharing.

Posted by Carrie Sampron, ABR SFR & Kathy Sampron (303) 931-3629 Highlands R (Home Smart Realty Group) about 8 years ago

Yes, Carrie, this could have been a disaster!  The gas line's integrity is crucial.  Over time this one's integrity could have been seriously compromised.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Jay - This was very well written and fun to read.  Wish you were in my neck of the woods!

Posted by Margaret Mitchell, Seacoast Maine & NH Real Estate (Coldwell Banker Yorke Realty) about 8 years ago

Wow, thank you Margaret!  We used to go to Lincoln every summer but our friend passed last spring.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Jay, that's crazy!  I can hardly believe your photo!  Thanks so much for sharing this.  I hope you won't mind the re-blog.  I have never thought about a pre-drywall inspection, but I will be recommending it to everyone, now!

Posted by Nicole Donaghy, Helping Families Home in Lexington and Columbia (Re/Max Purpose Driven) about 8 years ago

No, thank you for the reblog Nicole!  And I am glad to introduce you to a new inspection regimen!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Holy crap, that's one of the nastier things I've seen on a new construction inspection.  I think that whoever did that had to know damn well what they were doing.

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) about 8 years ago

Of course they did Reuben!  And everyone on site, supervisor included, saw it every day.  Why is nothing done until a home inspector comes along and dings it?  Where's the pride?  And professionalism?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

Good thing the detective was called.

Posted by Jerri McCombs, Hendersonville NC Relocation (Hendersonville NC Relocation) about 8 years ago

Jerri - and I am glad to be that detective!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

It is amazing it wasn't caught by the building inspector.  The moral of the story -When something looks like a duck don't be put off when someone says its not.

Posted by Marsha Cash (RE/MAX Advantage) about 8 years ago

It could be, Marsha, that the County inspector did not even go into that room!  And if he had, he might not have noticed the bounce.  He obviously did not go into the basement, as this problem was pretty glaring.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) about 8 years ago

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