What I'm Seeing Now

head_left_image

Stone Bridge, Manassas Battlefield Park

A popular and interesting remain of the two Civil War battles in Manassas, Virginia is the Stone Bridge.  It had an interesting role in both of the battles, although on the edge of the battlefield.

 

 

Perhaps hard to see, the bridge is located on the right of the map seen here, with the bold black line.

The Old Stone House, featured in a previous post, is just to the left of the bold black line, at the intersection about in the middle of the map.  The road connecting the two landmarks was then called the Warrenton Turnpike.

Interestingly, and a bit weird, when news got out about the First Battle of Bull Run, scores of Washingtonians packed picnic lunches and their carriages and rode out to "see the wah..."  They parked on the hill just above and to the left of the bold black line.  The crowd included Congressmen, Washington bureaucrats, war officials and their families and other well to do's.

The Union had barracks in Centreville, about three miles to the right of that bold black line.  The edge of the green on that map is only about 1.5 miles from the Stone Bridge.

Because of the near Union barracks, the Confederates had cut down many of the trees to give them a better sighted cannon shot and to see the Union troops if they approached and crossed the bridge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is how the bridge appears 10 April 2010, and how it probably appeared before the war.  The picture to the right shows the roadway over the bridge.  It is only 13 feet wide.  This view above looks directly toward where the Confederate cannons were set up to shower the bridge!  Only three miles behind this photo are the Union barracks in Centreville.  The bridge spans Bull Run Creek, which you see here.  My two relatives used this bridge, no doubt, on their approach to the battle.  Only one returned to cross it after wards.

Bull Run Creek was used by both sides to wash their wounds and it is said to have run red with blood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setting up their picnics on the hill in the distance, the "wah" got too close and the viewing gallery ran for their lives.  They had to return over that narrow, 13' wide bridge!  It was quite the traffic jam!  From this point the return to Washington is about 25 miles.

The bridge was virtually destroyed by the battle and intentionally by Union troops.  It was so destroyed  that the Confederates spanned it with wood so they could send guerrilla forays toward Centreville to harass the Union troops in the barracks there.  After the Second Battle of Manassas the Union troops angrily burned the wooden portion as they retreated.

 

 

 

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 13 commentsJay Markanich • April 10 2010 12:44PM

Comments

Jay, I enjoyed the history lesson very much.

I think I thought that the spectaters with their lunches were a little closer to home. 25 miles is a pretty good buggy ride.

Thanks

Posted by Gordon Sloan, Salt Lake Homes For Sale, Salt Lake Real Estate (Group1 Real Estate, selling houses in Salt Lake City Utah ) over 10 years ago

Corie - The spectators were where they thought to be the edge of the battle, close enough to watch, but far enough for safety.  They soon found out it was not safe!  That must have been quite the scene with all those people and their wagons, carriages and horses trying to flee over that small bridge!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

Jay,

When I was just a grade school kid my folks took me to some of the civil war sites in the US.

Posted by Steven L. Smith, Bellingham WA Home Inspector (King of the House Home Inspection, Inc.) over 10 years ago

Steve - That might have been during the great Centennial celebrations in the country.   That was real big around here, with school trips and hats and muskets.  We used to play Civil War in the neighborhood.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

I think you and Russel Ray should write history lessons from both coasts...yet another knowledge nugget from the Rain !

Posted by Sally K. & David L. Hanson, WI Real Estate Agents - Luxury - Divorce (EXP Realty 414-525-0563) over 10 years ago

Sally - there is so much here I could write about, I could do a local history blog and compile it into a history book.  Say....

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

The stream running red with blood makes me wince. My dad was back recently in Maryland for a civil war reenactment. I thought it was going to be one of those out in the fields and was a little worried about him. Turns out it was a virtual reenactment on a life size surround screen in the comfort of air conditioning. He said it was so real and so touching, it brought tears to their eyes.

 

Posted by Kate Kate over 10 years ago

Fun Kate!  Was it the Antietam Battlefield?  That's my favorite local battlefield for visiting.  It is less commercialized. 

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

Hmmm... not sure. How is Grampa doing?

Posted by Kate Kate over 10 years ago

Jay,

I am way too old to have been a kid with my folks during the centennial. I ain't the spring chicken you think. I was married and in broadcasting back then.

Posted by Steven L. Smith, Bellingham WA Home Inspector (King of the House Home Inspection, Inc.) over 10 years ago

Kate - if you are referring to me I am doing very little but getting email updates after doctor visits!  My daughter is in Orem, Utah, so that is a bit far from here.

Steve - I was born in '53 (today in fact...) and so I was the perfect age for the Centennial celebrations and playing Civil War with my friends.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

Jay - Such a brutal time in our history, very sad.  

Thanks for proving us with a little history.  I look forward to many more posts.

Posted by Steve Hall, Make the Call to Hankins and Hall (RE/MAX United) over 10 years ago

Again Steve - Glad you enjoy them!  The other day the Stone House was open for tourists and I drove by without time to stop in.  There are some things carved into the walls and floors there that I want to write about!  Maybe one day it will be open and I have time.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

This blog does not allow anonymous comments