What I'm Seeing Now

head_left_image

I Am Not Your General Contractor!

Well, at least not for free.

I get interesting phone calls. This one was from a seller. “Your home inspection cost me a lot of money. I cannot sell my house until I fix the problems you said on your report. I have a contractor here now. You need to stop by immediately and tell him what to do. I am the house on Virginia Avenue.”

“Ma’am, I remember the house well, and all the problems. But, I am not nearby, have an appointment now and another after that. I can’t drop all that simply to stop by your house. But, please understand, what repairs you do or don’t do on your house are not my purview. My clients were the buyers. I don’t return to the houses I inspect to make sure any repairs are done correctly, unless you want to pay me.”

“Well, they aren’t buying the house, because of you! So I am your client now. And you have cost me so much money already I certainly will not pay you! My Realtor tells me she cannot sell the house until I have done everything on your list. You need to at least be available by phone when my contractor has questions. There is a lot to do!” (Wow…)

“If he is a professional contractor and knows what he is doing, he should not need to call me. I am not your general contractor.”

The problems, in part, were: bathroom remodel which leaked from the toilet and sink drain into the furnace room below; severe mold issues in the furnace room beneath that bathroom (which the seller tried to “hide” with storage); new carpeting and newly painted basement walls, but painted only in certain spots; not well-concealed stains under that new paint; serious moisture issues – 80+% - in those basement walls (which could mean many things, all behind drywall); a remodeled basement bathroom with mold in the walls behind the shower (which the seller ALSO tried to “hide” with storage). There were other things, but this is what the contractor was working to correct for now.

My recommendation: When storage is artfully placed in areas where it typically would not be, there might be intention to hide something. When parts, but not all, of basement walls are freshly painted, there might be intention to hide something. When sellers are upset when things are moved and problems found, they know they are caught, and they are INTENDING to hide something. Head’s up!

And don’t try to sell undisclosed problems to someone else… but you already knew that!

Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC  

Based in Bristow, serving all of Northern Virginia.

Office (703) 330-6388   Cell (703) 585-7560

www.jaymarinspect.com


Comment balloon 45 commentsJay Markanich • October 08 2009 09:19PM
I Am Not Your General Contractor!
share
Well, at least not for free. I get interesting phone calls. This one was from a seller. “Your home inspection cost me a lot of money. I cannot sell my house until I fix the problems you said on your report. I have a contractor here now. You… more
Going Postal
share
Not often does do I have the opportunity to go back to a house following a home inspection. I inspected this particular house just a couple of weeks ago. And, in addition to its problems, it had high radon, requiring remediation, which the sellers… more
Here's A Flash - No Deck Flashing!
share
Every time I bring up deck flashing on an inspection I get called out! I have had homeowners tell me that only roofs need flashing. One said he has seen window flashing but had never heard of deck flashing. Another called me a "$&*%… more
Elvis Has Left The Building
share
Recovery after surgery used to mean bed rest and soft food. Lay flat, get some sleep. Catch up on your reading. Draw the blinds and drapes. No excitement. That's probably why it took so long to recuperate. There is a different philosophy… more